punter

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punt 1

 (pŭnt)
n.
An open flatbottom boat with squared ends, used in shallow waters and usually propelled by a long pole.
v. punt·ed, punt·ing, punts
v.tr.
1. To propel (a boat) with a pole.
2. To carry in a punt.
v.intr.
To go in a punt.

[Probably Middle English *punt, from Old English punt, from Latin pontō, pontoon, flatbottom boat, from pōns, pont-, bridge; see pent- in Indo-European roots.]

punt′er n.

punt 2

 (pŭnt) Football
n.
A kick in which the ball is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground.
v. punt·ed, punt·ing, punts
v.tr.
To propel (a ball) by means of a punt.
v.intr.
1. To execute a punt.
2. Informal To cease doing something; give up: Let's punt on this and try something else.

[Perhaps from dialectal punt, to strike, push, perhaps alteration of bunt.]

punt′er n.

punt 3

 (pŭnt)
intr.v. punt·ed, punt·ing, punts
1. Games To lay a bet against the bank, as in roulette.
2. Chiefly British Slang To gamble.

[French ponter, from obsolete pont, past participle of pondre, to put (obsolete), lay an egg, from Old French, to lay an egg, from Latin pōnere; see apo- in Indo-European roots.]

punt′er n.

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punt4

punt 4

 (pŭnt)
n.
The indentation in the bottom of a champagne or wine bottle.

[Perhaps from punty.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

punter

(ˈpʌntə)
n
(Nautical Terms) a person who punts a boat

punter

(ˈpʌntə)
n
(Ball Games, other than specified) a person who kicks a ball

punter

(ˈpʌntə)
n
1. (Horse Racing) a person who places a bet
2. (Gambling, except Cards) a person who places a bet
3. (Commerce) informal any member of the public, esp when a customer: the punters flock into the sales.
4. slang a prostitute's client
5. slang a victim of a con man
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.punter - someone who propels a boat with a pole
boatman, waterman, boater - someone who drives or rides in a boat
2.punter - (football) a person who kicks the football by dropping it from the hands and contacting it with the foot before it hits the ground
football, football game - any of various games played with a ball (round or oval) in which two teams try to kick or carry or propel the ball into each other's goal
kicker - a player who kicks the football
3.punter - someone who betspunter - someone who bets      
taker - one who takes a bet or wager
caller - the bettor in a card game who matches the bet and calls for a show of hands
gambler - a person who wagers money on the outcome of games or sporting events
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

punter

noun
1. gambler, better, backer, punt (chiefly Brit.) Punters are expected to gamble £70m on the Grand National.
2. (Informal) customer, guest, client, patron, member of the audience The show ended when an irate punter punched one of the performers.
3. (Informal) person, guy (informal), fellow, bloke (Brit. informal), man in the street Most of these artists are not known to the ordinary punter.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

punter

[ˈpʌntəʳ] (esp Brit) N
1. (Brit) (Racing) (= gambler) → jugador(a) m/f, apostador(a) m/f
2. (= customer) → cliente mf; [of prostitute] → cliente mf
the punter(s) (Brit) (= customer, member of public) → el público
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

punter

[ˈpʌntər] n
(British) (= gambler) → parieur/euse m/f
(= customer, client) → chaland(e) m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

punter

1
n (= boater)Stechkahnfahrer(in) m(f)

punter

2
n
(Brit inf) (= better)Wetter(in) m(f); (= gambler)Spieler(in) m(f)
(esp Brit inf: = customer etc) → Kunde m, → Kundin f; (of prostitute)Freier m (inf); the average punterOtto Normalverbraucher
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

punter

[ˈpʌntəʳ] n (Brit) (fam) (gambler) → scommettitore/trice; (customer) → cliente m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He had lost just as much himself to Blackstone of the Hussars, and Count Punter of the Hanoverian Cavalry.
Up he would march to the head of the punt, plant his pole, and then run along right to the other end, just like an old punter. Oh!
BOOZED-UP revellers will pump around [euro]110million into the local Cheltenham economy - with Irish punters alone expected to spend around [euro]22million.
THERE has undoubtedly been an increase in the number of punters who voice their dissatisfaction at having their stakes restricted, either partially or to such an extent they may as well not have bothered asking.
THE controversies and infighting within the BJP seem to have very little impact on punters across the country.
All were designed to speed what punters call their "get-off time," and enhance his distance and placement.
LADBROKES has said punters staked nearly pounds 13bn in its UK shops last year, as the high street bookie continued to defy the economic squeeze.
THE Mirror Punters Club is back with an unbeatable offer for all racing fans.
Admission to 100+ race meetings worth more than pounds 1,500, Mirror Punters Club Badge Stable visits and behind the scenes racecourse tours
How would you like to be a member of one of our Punters Panels for next season?
Bookmakers reported mixed fortunes after a closely-matched firstday jousting between the layers and punters at Cheltenham.