pure mathematics

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Noun1.pure mathematics - the branches of mathematics that study and develop the principles of mathematics for their own sake rather than for their immediate usefulness
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
arithmetic - the branch of pure mathematics dealing with the theory of numerical calculations
geometry - the pure mathematics of points and lines and curves and surfaces
numerical analysis - (mathematics) the branch of mathematics that studies algorithms for approximating solutions to problems in the infinitesimal calculus
trig, trigonometry - the mathematics of triangles and trigonometric functions
algebra - the mathematics of generalized arithmetical operations
infinitesimal calculus, calculus - the branch of mathematics that is concerned with limits and with the differentiation and integration of functions
set theory - the branch of pure mathematics that deals with the nature and relations of sets
group theory - the branch of mathematics dealing with groups
analysis situs, topology - the branch of pure mathematics that deals only with the properties of a figure X that hold for every figure into which X can be transformed with a one-to-one correspondence that is continuous in both directions
metamathematics - the logical analysis of mathematical reasoning
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
čistá matematika
ren matematikk
ren matematik
References in periodicals archive ?
Sixaba graduated from Rhodes University this past April with a bachelor's of science degree after having completed a triple major in pure math, applied math and mathematical statistics.
However, in the discussion of frequentist statistical thinking ("selling of the property again and again"), pure math theory seems to override the reality of the problem, and the discussion exemplifies the problems of imposing a statistic-inferential solution on to a one-off appraisal question.
My interests lay in pure mathematics--topics like abstract algebra and analysis and number theory--and I lacked any desire to study applied math, the practical math that engineers use to build bridges and physicists use to model the behavior of particles; but I could not shake the feeling that studying pure math would be a pointless endeavor, qualifying me only to teach pure math to students who might one day teach pure math to students and so on and so forth.
Liu: Geodesic lightlike submanifolds of indefinite Sasakian manifolds, Advances in Pure Math., 1(2011), No.
our pure math was right, but a means to make it applicable to the task at hand did not exist." This comment is revealing in that it highlights a common preconception (due, undoubtedly, to how the subject is taught) that mathematics is purely computational, driven by preexisting formulas, and that these computations must have binary outcomes (right or wrong) with no room for "fuzzy thinking." Another student commented, "the most unexpected discovery during this project was to how much of an extent mathematics cannot account for all the imperfections of the real world.