puritan

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Pu·ri·tan

 (pyo͝or′ĭ-tn)
n.
1. A member of a group of English Protestants who in the 1500s and 1600s advocated strict religious discipline along with simplification of the ceremonies and creeds of the Church of England.
2. puritan A person who is very strict or austere in religious practice or moral outlook, especially someone who regards pleasure or luxury as sinful.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Puritans or Puritanism.
2. puritan Characteristic of a puritan; puritanical.

[From Late Latin pūritās, purity (on the model of Medieval Latin Kathari, "the Pure Ones," a third-century sect of rigorist heretics), from Latin pūrus, pure; see peuə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

puritan

(ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
a person who adheres to strict moral or religious principles, esp one opposed to luxury and sensual enjoyment
adj
characteristic of a puritan
[C16: from Late Latin pūritās purity]
ˈpuritanˌism n

Puritan

(in the late 16th and 17th centuries ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
1. (Protestantism) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
2. (Historical Terms) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
adj
3. (Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
4. (Protestantism) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
ˈPuritanˌism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Pu•ri•tan

(ˈpyʊər ɪ tn)

n.
1. a member of a group of Protestants that arose in the 16th century within the Church of England, demanding the simplification of doctrine and worship and greater strictness in religious discipline.
2. (l.c.) a person who is strict in moral or religious matters.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Puritans.
4. (l.c.) puritanical.
[1540–50; < Late Latin pūrit(ās) purity]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Puritan - a member of a group of English Protestants who in the 16th and 17th centuries thought that the Protestant Reformation under Elizabeth was incomplete and advocated the simplification and regulation of forms of worship
Protestant - an adherent of Protestantism
2.puritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principlespuritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principles; someone opposed to sensual pleasures
abstainer, ascetic - someone who practices self denial as a spiritual discipline
3.puritan - a person excessively concerned about propriety and decorum
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

puritan

noun
1. moralist, fanatic, zealot, prude, pietist, rigorist He delighted in dealing with subjects that enraged puritans.
adjective
1. strict, austere, puritanical, narrow, severe, intolerant, ascetic, narrow-minded, moralistic, prudish, hidebound, strait-laced Paul has always had a puritan streak.
Quotations
"The Puritan hated bear-baiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators" [Lord Macaulay History of England]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

puritan

noun
A person who is too much concerned with being proper, modest, or righteous:
Informal: old maid.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
بيوريتاني: مُتَزَمِّت في أمور الدّينمُتَزَمِّت ، مُتَشَدِّد
-kapuritán
asketpuritaner
puritán
púrítanipúrítani, siîavandur/strangtrúaîur maîur
puritonaspuritoniškas
puritānis
puritán
Püritensofta/bağnaz kimse

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən]
A. ADJpuritano
B. Npuritano/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (RELIGION)puritain(e) m/f

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (= puritanical person) → puritain(e) m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

puritan

(Rel: also Puritan)
adjpuritanisch
nPuritaner(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtn] adj & npuritano/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

puritan

(ˈpjuəritən) noun
1. a person who is strict and disapproves of many kinds of enjoyment.
2. formerly, in England and America, a member of a religious group wanting to make church worship etc simpler and plainer.
ˌpuriˈtanical (-ˈtӕ-) adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pour ce faire, il importerait de ragaillardir les institutions, en se montrant encore plus puritain a leur egard, au service des citoyens, sans verser, pour autant, dans le traitement drastique.
Pour un autre auteur de la Generation de 27, Luis Cernuda, le Sud, dans un poeme intitule "El Sur," est "un desert qui chante sa chanson," lieu vague et sans localisation precise, ou il reve de s'exiler pour vivre librement une sensualite jugee deviante dans un "nord" plus froid et puritain.
Review of Pierre Legouis, Andre Marvell, pobte, puritain, patriote, 1621-1678.
The subtitle of Pierre Legouis' 1928 biography of Marvell in French (shortened, updated, and translated in 1965) had added the terms "Poet" and "Puritan" to "Patriot": Andre Marvell: Poete, Puritain, Patriote.
Unusual for academics of his time he was well-versed in popular culture and, unprompted, could call off from memory lines from Le Puritain, Jeff Musso's 1938 French language adaptation of Liam O'Flaherty's The Puritan.