echinacea

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ech·i·na·ce·a

 (ĕk′ə-nā′sē-ə, -nā′shə)
n.
1. Any of several coneflowers of the genus Echinacea, having usually pinkish-purple ray flowers.
2. The roots, seeds, or other parts of such a plant, used in herbal medicine.

[New Latin Echīnācea, genus name, from Latin echīnus, sea urchin (from its rough leaves); see echinus.]

echinacea

(ˌɛkɪˈneɪʃɪə)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: purple coneflower either of the two N American plants of the genus Echinacea, having flower heads with purple rays and black centres: family Compositae (composites). See coneflower
2. (Plants) the powdered root of either of these plants, used to stimulate the immune system
[from New Latin, from Latin echīnātus prickly, from echīnus hedgehog]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Echinacea - small genus of North American coarse perennial herbsEchinacea - small genus of North American coarse perennial herbs
asterid dicot genus - genus of more or less advanced dicotyledonous herbs and some trees and shrubs
aster family, Asteraceae, Compositae, family Asteraceae, family Compositae - plants with heads composed of many florets: aster; daisy; dandelion; goldenrod; marigold; lettuces; ragweed; sunflower; thistle; zinnia
coneflower - any of various perennials of the eastern United States having thick rough leaves and long-stalked showy flowers with drooping rays and a conelike center
Translations

ech·i·na·ce·a

n. equinacea, planta medicinal que reduce la inflamación.

Echinacea

(bot) Echinacea
References in periodicals archive ?
These insects would rather have the pure natives: purple coneflower, pale purple coneflower and yellow (or Ozark) coneflower.
Hedera helix (ivy), Echinacea purpurea (purple coneflower), Digitalis (foxgloves) and Galanthus nivalis (common snowdrop) are all big hits.
Hedera helix (ivy), Echinacea purpurea (purple coneflower), Digi-Avoid pesticides that get into nectar and harm pollinators talis ( foxgloves) and Galanthus nivalis (common snowdrop) are all big hits.
this time with the finch pilfering purple coneflower seeds in my garden
The purple coneflower, echinacea, is another winner.
Echinacea purpurea - the purple coneflower is beneficial in winter time for helping to ward off coughs and colds, but right now this herbaceous perennial is gracing our gardens.
In Vermont, she said, rain gardens often include summersweet, inkberry, shrubby dogwoods and purple coneflower.
Echinacea is extracted from the Eastern Purple Coneflower, which is found in North America, and has long been used as a herbal remedy for the common cold.
We can also celebrate the fact that many species, including the Maguire daisy (Erigeron maguirei) and Tennessee purple coneflower (Echinacea tennesseensis), have been removed from the list of endangered and threatened species because the ESA's protection is no longer necessary for their survival.
Casual drifts of yellow yarrow, blue-violet Russian sage, purple coneflower, and Pennisetum setaceum 'Rubruin' in this Portland garden ramble as if they were planted by nature.
Echinacea, also known as purple coneflower, has gained popularity in recent years as a nutritional supplement that proponents believe is helpful in staving off the common cold and shortening its duration.