bitterbrush

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bit·ter·brush

 (bĭt′ər-brŭsh′)
n.
A shrub (Pushia tridentata) of the rose family found in western North America, having bitter-tasting leaves and often browsed by deer, elk, and pronghorn.

bitterbrush

(ˈbɪtəˌbrʌʃ)
n
(Plants) a flowering plant of the genus Purshia, native to North America
References in periodicals archive ?
Forest cover was dominated by climax Lodgepole Pine-Bitterbrush shrub (Purshia tridentata), and higher hills supported Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa), Sugar Pine (Pinus lambertiana), Western White Pine (Pinus monticola), White Fir (Abies concolor), and Red Fir (Abies magnifica) (Franklin and Dyrness 1988).
with understories of native forbs and grasses with some aspen Populus tremuloides, mountain shrubs (Amelanchier spp., Purshia spp., Rosa spp.), and small trees (Juniperus spp.).
Silvester, "Amplification of 16S rRNA genes from Frankia strains in root nodules of Ceanothus griseus, Coriaria arborea, Coriaria plumosa, Discaria toumatou, and Purshia tridentata," Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol.
They found that horses avoid feeding on antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), a plant species highly used by wildlife, and 40-86% of their diet was composed of grasses, followed by forbs and shrubs in no more than 5%.
In southeast Idaho moose forage primarily on bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), willow, serviceberry, chokecherry (Prunus virginiana), and aspen (Populus tremuloides) (Ritchie 1978).
Both sites had a similar cover of Joshua trees, but CF cover was dominated by live shrubs (Lycium andersonii, Purshia tridentata var.
wyomingensis Beetle & Young), rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus (Hook.) Nutt.), and antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata (Pursh) DC.).
Similarly, three species of pines (Pinus) and several other plants (e.g., antelope bitterbrush, Purshia tridentata; Sierra chinquapin, Castanopsis sempervirens) in the Carson Range of Nevada rely on a guild of seed-caching animals (at least four species of rodent and two species of bird) for dispersal.
rubroscutellatus use other woody plants as hosts, we sampled trees and shrubs near Apache plume sites, particularly those in the Rosaceae: antelope bitterbrush, Purshia tridentata (Pursh) DC; Stansbury cliffrose, P.
Rodents have been found to remove up to 89% of antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) seeds (Vander Wall, 1994).
Bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), sagebrush, and rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosum) predominate in a mosaic where patches of blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) and mormon tea (Ephedra nevadensis) are common.