Pushkin


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Push·kin

 (po͝osh′kĭn, po͞osh′-), Aleksandr Sergeyevich 1799-1837.
Russian writer whose works include the verse novel Eugene Onegin (1831), the play Boris Godunov (1831), and many narrative and lyrical poems and short stories.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pushkin

(ˈpʊʃkɪn)
n
(Placename) a town in NW Russia: site of the imperial summer residence and Catherine the Great's palace. Pop: 84 628 (2002). Former name: Tsarskoye Selo (1708–1937)

Pushkin

(ˈpʊʃkɪn)
n
(Biography) Aleksander Sergeyevich (alɪkˈsandr sɪrˈɡjejɪvitʃ). 1799–1837, Russian poet, novelist, and dramatist. His works include the romantic verse tale The Prisoner of the Caucasus (1822), the verse novel Eugene Onegin (1833), the tragedy Boris Godunov (1825), and the novel The Captain's Daughter (1836)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Push•kin

(ˈpʊʃ kɪn)

n.
Alexander Sergeevich, 1799–1837, Russian poet and playwright.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Pushkin - Russian poet (1799-1837)Pushkin - Russian poet (1799-1837)    
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Translations
References in classic literature ?
"I don't think we have a copy of Pushkin in the house."
"It is our own Pushkin, our family copy, Annenkoff's edition; it could not be bought now.
For them, it is not a question of showing that Pushkin is stupid, or that Russia must be torn in pieces.
Rostopchin's broadsheets, headed by woodcuts of a drink shop, a potman, and a Moscow burgher called Karpushka Chigirin, "who- having been a militiaman and having had rather too much at the pub- heard that Napoleon wished to come to Moscow, grew angry, abused the French in very bad language, came out of the drink shop, and, under the sign of the eagle, began to address the assembled people," were read and discussed, together with the latest of Vasili Lvovich Pushkin's bouts rimes.
I knew that he had long wanted to possess a complete set of Pushkin's works, in the latest edition; so, I decided to buy Pushkin.
Luckily, I soon chanced upon a set of Pushkin, handsomely bound, and set myself to bargain for it.
These eleven volumes of Pushkin are priced at thirty-two-and-a-half roubles, and I have only thirty roubles.
The old man led off the meal by saying that Pushkin was a magnificent poet.
I was actually on the point of tears, though I knew perfectly well at that moment that all this was out of Pushkin's Silvio and Lermontov's Masquerade.
In June 1880 he made his famous speech at the unveiling of the monument to Pushkin in Moscow and he was received with extraordinary demonstrations of love and honour.
The following three translations are intended to acquaint the non-Russian reader with some of the highlights of Pushkin scholarship over the past eighty years.