psoralen

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pso·ra·len

 (sôr′ə-lən)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds found in certain plants, used to treat psoriasis and vitiligo.

[From New Latin Psōralea, plant genus, from Greek psōralea, neuter pl. of psōraleos, mangy (from the appearance of the plants' leaves), from psōrā, itch.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

psoralen

(ˈsɔːrəˌlɛn)
n
(Pharmacology) any of various naturally occurring photoreactive chemicals, found in some plants, some of which are used in the treatment of skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

psoralen

n psoraleno; — plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) psoraleno más luz ultravioleta A
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment includes topical steroids, mechlorethamine (nitrogen mustard) or bexarotene gel, PUVA therapy, and narrow band UVB light for limited and/ or patch disease.
Production of pigment by inoculation of ANEM does not seem to be influenced by the age, sex, site of the lesion, duration of disease and duration of PUVA therapy.
Between 2006 and 2014 the patient received several systemic treatment lines including methotrexate, PUVA therapy, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, polychemotherapy, histone deacetylase inhibitors, and anti-CCR4 monoclonal antibody.
(18) PUVA therapy Increased Treg cells in blood after successful treatment (PASI 90) Kubo et al.
Topical and systemic antifungal agents, topical steroids, topical antimicrobial agents, and PUVA therapy have been used to treat PMH; however, no consistently effective therapy has been established.
Therefore, therapeutic measures which inhibit IL-2 (PUVA therapy, tacrolimus, thalidomide) are effective in treating pruritus which is nonresponsive to conventional treatments.
In a large study, the incidence of erythema accompanying PUVA therapy was 32.3%.16 Our results were in agreement with other international and local studies.10,13,14.17 Although there were no serious short term adverse reactions seen in our study, there is an established risk of developing cutaneous malignancies with prolong use of PUVA.
While a recent systematic review with over 25 years of dermatologic experience worldwide does not clearly substantiate that skin cancer risk is necessarily increased in patients using CsA for cutaneous diseases, unlike organ transplant recipients [55], it is well established that there is an increased risk of nonmelanoma skin cancers with association of PUVA therapy and CsA [56].