Pyrenees


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Pyr·e·nees

 (pîr′ə-nēz′)
A mountain range of southwest Europe extending along the French-Spanish border from the Bay of Biscay to the Mediterranean Sea. Pico de Aneto, its highest point, rises to 3,404 m (11,168 ft).

Pyr′e·ne′an adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pyrenees

(ˌpɪrəˈniːz)
pl n
(Placename) a mountain range between France and Spain, extending from the Bay of Biscay to the Mediterranean. Highest peak: Pico de Aneto, 3404 m (11 168 ft)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Pyr•e•nees

(ˈpɪr əˌniz)

n.pl.
a mountain range between Spain and France. Highest peak, Pico de Aneto, 11,165 ft. (3400 m).
Pyr`e•ne′an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pyrenees - a chain of mountains between France and SpainPyrenees - a chain of mountains between France and Spain
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Espana, Kingdom of Spain, Spain - a parliamentary monarchy in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula; a former colonial power
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Pyrenees

[ˌpɪrəˈniːz] NPL the Pyreneesel Pirineo, los Pirineos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Pyrenees

[ˌpɪrəˈniːz] npl
the Pyrenees → les Pyrénées fpl
in the Pyrenees → dans les Pyrénées
to the Pyrenees
We went to the Pyrenees → Nous sommes allés dans les Pyrénées.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Pyrenees

plPyrenäen pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Pyrenees

[pɪrəˈniːz] npl the Pyreneesi Pirenei
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The Pyrenees, her iron sides pressed low in the water by her cargo of wheat, rolled sluggishly, and made it easy for the man who was climbing aboard from out a tiny outrigger canoe.
It is indeed a remarkable fact to see so many of the same plants living on the snowy regions of the Alps or Pyrenees, and in the extreme northern parts of Europe; but it is far more remarkable, that the plants on the White Mountains, in the United States of America, are all the same with those of Labrador, and nearly all the same, as we hear from Asa Gray, with those on the loftiest mountains of Europe.
The possibility of raising Catalonia in the interest of the REY NETTO, who had just then crossed the Pyrenees, was much discussed there.
Of the Alps and Pyrenees, with their pine forests and their vices, they might give a faithful delineation; and Italy, Switzerland, and the south of France might be as fruitful in horrors as they were there represented.
It was on a Monday that the Duke of Lancaster's division passed safely through the Pyrenees. On the Tuesday there was a bitter frost, and the ground rung like iron beneath the feet of the horses; yet ere evening the prince himself, with the main battle of his army, had passed the gorge and united with his vanguard at Pampeluna.
Another, by a slight curve, furrowed the "Sea of Nectar," breaking against the chain of Pyrenees, after a circuit of 800 miles.
You cannot be ignorant that your king, Louis XIV, thinking that the gesture of a potentate was sufficient to bring the Pyrenees under his yoke, had imposed the Duke of Anjou, his grandson, on the Spaniards.
A beech tree on the slopes of the Pyrenees is just what a beech tree here in these Carlisle woods is; and there used to be an old pine hereabouts whose twin brother I was well acquainted with in a dell among the Apennines.
The puma and the jaguar would haunt the Pyrenees. In the latitude of Mont Blanc, but on an island as far westward as Central North America, tree-ferns and parasitical Orchideae would thrive amidst the thick woods.
I rave: perhaps at this moment he is watching the sun rise over the Pyrenees, or on the tideless sea of the south."
I think it must have been in the Pyrenees, many years ago.
It was even said that the inspiration and the resolution of the war going on now over the Pyrenees had come out from that head.