Pythonesque


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Pythonesque

(ˌpaɪθəˈnɛsk)
adj
denoting a kind of humour that is absurd and unpredictable; zany; surreal
[C20: named after the British television show Monty Python's Flying Circus, first broadcast in 1969]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

Pythonesque

[ˌpaɪθəˈnesk] ADJpitonesco, del estilo de Monty Python
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, that definitive Pythonesque sketch, The Four Yorkshireman, was first performed on At Last The 1948 Show.
Either he'd tried to flee the grim mess or he was being perversely Pythonesque.
Remaining Pythons John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Sir Michael Palin said: "Python has survived because we live in an increasingly Pythonesque world.
Monty Python have revealed events to mark their 50th anniversary in what they dubbed "an increasingly Pythonesque world".
Frostrup suggested there is currently the sense that there is a "mob that moves in a kind of Monty Pythonesque way whenever someone shouts, 'He's a witch'."
An affable blend of Pythonesque absurdity, artfully drawn from an evident love of metal, they have the crowd in the palm of their collective claw from Sixty-Six minutes past Six."
Serious doubts also hang over whether Gilliam's Pythonesque movie will be allowed to close the festival after it became embroiled in a bitter legal battle over who owns the rights.
Brendan Mulroy started his epic reverse gear trek at 7am in an almost Monty Pythonesque quest to reach the top of Ireland's famous mountain without looking where he was going.
And the laughs reach a peak as we watch a pair of grotesques (Giles Terera's Prince of Morocco and Christopher Logan's hilarious, Pythonesque Prince of Arragon) bid for the hand of the fair Portia (a sparkling Rachel Pickup).
Voter confidence in the whole process will hardly be bolstered by the Monty Pythonesque spat between the various groups claiming to be the official party of "Exit", while we also have the unedifying scene of dozens of Conservative MPs apparently willing to trade their allegiance for future ministerial posts!
Medieval Lives, presented by Terry Jones, intersperses scholarly sections with Pythonesque sketches.