Q-methodology

Q-methodology

n
(Statistics) a statistical methodology used by psychologists to identify alternative world-views, opinions, interpretations, etc, in terms of statistically independent patterns of response recognized by clustering together individuals whose orderings of items, typically attitude statements, are similar. Compare R-methodology
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This notion is better quantified by Valenta and Wigger (1997): "Generalizations in Q-methodology research are based on the validity and theoretical implications of identified opinion types, and not on their numerical distribution among study participants" (p.
Motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment: an application of Q-methodology. Patient Preference and Adherence, 2015; 9: 249-56.
These ideas led to the Q-Methodology study (Author, 2012) discussed later.
Due to the need to measure self-efficacy both quantitatively and qualitatively, Q-methodology was deemed to be a logical approach.
Interpretations of informed choice in antenatal screening: a cross-cultural, Q-methodology study.
In their article, "Four Views of the Professional School Counselor-Principal Relationship: a Q-Methodology Study," published in the August 2008 issue of Professional School Counseling, Christopher Janson, Matthew Militello and Natalie Kosine, state, "School principals and professional school counselors matter.
Q-methodology was chosen to implement in this research study.
Second, we introduce Q-methodology and explain how it can be used to examine and clarify the PSM construct.
Stephenson's (1953) Q-methodology provides a way to identify and describe different subjectively held belief systems.
Although Stephenson's Q-sort is well known to psychologists, his more elaborate Q-methodology is not.
It is not coincidental that Stephenson's Q-Methodology is called operant subjectivity.
Applying Q-Methodology to Phenomenological Descriptions of Children's Experiences