Love wave

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Love wave

n.
A type of seismic surface wave that causes rock particles to move with a side-to-side motion perpendicular to the direction of an earthquake's main propagation. Love waves travel faster than Rayleigh waves. Also called L wave.

[After Augustus Edward Hough Love (1863-1940), British mathematician.]
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The first positive deflection is depicted by R-wave, irrespective of the fact that it is surpassed by a Q-wave or not S wave is the next negative aberration which is superseded by the R-wave [6].
The following variables were assessed as predictors for the composite endpoint: i) Q-wave, ii) LVEF<50%, iii) VT, iv) 24-h SDNN<100 ms, v) DUR>150 ms, and vi) IVET + .
Clinical follow-up at one year demonstrated no cardiac related deaths, Q-wave MI, or stent thrombosis for any of the stent groups.
5 mg/dl, n (%) Data are presented as mean [+ or -] SD and numbers (percentages) * unpaired t test and Chi-square test LVEF--left ventricular ejection fraction, LVVs--left ventricular end-systolic volume, NT-pro BNP N--terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, sPAP--Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure Q-left time, the time from the onset of the Q-wave on the surface ECG to the onset of the regional systolic motion of left ventricle (evaluated by TDI).
Considerable importance is attributed to the fact that non Q-wave myocardial infarction in the elderly develops in association with already existing co-morbidities, each of those having own specific features.
q]-diffution, the q-wave and the [[partial derivative.
58 years) and more likely to have Q-wave or ST-T changes on resting ECG (47% vs.
Although the Q waves of myocardial infarction are often considered to be permanent electrocardiographic abnormalities, numerous studies have described infarct Q-wave disappearance in from 7% to 42% of patients.
These silent heart attacks, known as unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMIs), are usually discovered when a change in the Q-wave pattern on an EKG indicates a heart attack has occurred.
But if a heart attack happened in the distant past, physicians rely on the appearance of a specific alteration on an ECG called a Q-wave, which signals the presence of damaged tissue.
The new technique was able to detect silent heart attacks not picked up by electrocardiogram because they didn't generate the Q-wave patterns measured by ECGs.
younger than 65 years), gender, Q-wave versus non-Q-wave MI status, heart failure class, revascularization, or nationality (United States vs.