phentermine

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Related to Qsymia: phentermine, Topiramate, Belviq

phen·ter·mine

 (fĕn′tər-mēn′)
n.
A drug, C10H15N, that suppresses appetite by altering the metabolism of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine and is used in its hydrochloride form in the management of obesity.

[phen(yl) + ter(tiary) + (butyla)mine, one of its constituents.]
Translations

phentermine

n fentermina
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References in periodicals archive ?
where she led risk evaluation and mitigation strategy for Qsymia to treat weight loss, while also building relationships with thought leaders and key opinion leaders (KOLs).
Previously, Dr Troupin worked as vice president in medical affairs at VIVUS, where she led risk evaluation and mitigation strategy for Qsymia to treat weight loss, while also building relationships with thought leaders and key opinion leaders.
Amitriptyline* Elavil Bupropion * Wellbutrin, Zyban Clomipramine* Anafranil Desipramine* Norpramin Exenatide* Byetta, Bydureon Imipramine* Tofranil Levomilnacipran * Fetzima Liraglutide * Victoza, Saxenda Lorcaserin * Belviq Metformin * Glucophage Methylphenidate * Ritalin, Methylin Mirtazapine* Remeron Naltrexone/bupropion * Contrave Nefazodone * Serzone Nortriptyline* Pamelor Olanzapine* Zyprexa Orlistat* Xenical Paroxetine * Paxil Phentermine/topiramate * Qsymia Pramlintide* Symlin Protriptyline* Vivactil Quetiapine* Seroquel Trazodone * Desyrel, Oleptro Vilazodone* Viibryd Vortioxetine * Trintellix Zonisamide * Zonegran
In clinical trials that tested Qsymia and Belviq, between 50 and 62 percent of the study participants lost at least five percent of their weight after taking the medication for one year.
For Qsymia, however, topiramate is contraindicated in pregnancy and is a pregnancy category X, because its use "can cause fetal harm, and weight loss offers no potential benefit to a pregnant woman," the labeling states.
Those drugs are Qsymia, which is sold by Vivus, and Belviq, which is from Arena Pharmaceuticals and Eisai.
The company has been sued by Vivus, which had submitted an ANDA for generic Qsymia.
Currently only three drugs, Orlistat, Lorcaserin and Qsymia are approved by the Food and Drug Adminsitration (FDA) for the long term treatment of obesity (Adan, 2013).
If proven safe, GBI Research expects the sales of Qsymia and other drugs expected to be approved over the forecast period to increase the market size to $2.
Nearly a year after both prescription drugs were approved, Belviq and Qsymia, are available.
Data has shown that people who take the highest dose of Qsymia can achieve up to a 10.