patent medicine

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patent medicine

n
(Pharmacology) a medicine protected by a patent and available without a doctor's prescription
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pat′ent med′icine


n.
1. a nonprescription drug that is protected by the trademark of a company that owns the patent on its manufacture or is licensed to distribute it.
2. any proprietary drug.
[1760–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patent medicine - medicine that is protected by a patent and available without a doctor's prescriptionpatent medicine - medicine that is protected by a patent and available without a doctor's prescription
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
nostrum - patent medicine whose efficacy is questionable
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
lääkepatenttilääke

patent medicine

nprodotto medicinale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The musical melange has elements of blues and some of the 19th-century medicineshow banjo-driven entertainment which would hold the crowd's interest prior to the pitch of the quack remedy salesman for snakeoil and other such wonder potions.
The musical melange has elements of blues and some of the 19th century medicine-show banjo-driven entertainment which would hold the crowd's interest prior to the pitch of the quack remedy salesman for snake-oil and other such wonder potions.
Laetrile had entered the public dialogue as a quack remedy, so much of the response from the cancer institutions, lay press, science press, and individual researchers had to do with whether Sloan-Kettering was going to endorse a quack treatment.