Quaker


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Related to Quaker: Amish

Quak·er

 (kwā′kər)
n.
A member of the Society of Friends.

[From quake (from an early leader's admonishment to "tremble at the word of the Lord").]

Quak′er·ism n.
Quak′er·ly adv. & adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Quaker

(ˈkweɪkə)
n
(Protestantism) a member of the Religious Society of Friends, a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1650, whose central belief is the doctrine of the Inner Light. Quakers reject sacraments, ritual, and formal ministry, hold meetings at which any member may speak, and have promoted many causes for social reform
adj
(Protestantism) of, relating to, or designating the Religious Society of Friends or its religious beliefs or practices
[C17: originally a derogatory nickname, alluding either to their alleged ecstatic fits, or to George Fox's injunction to "quake at the word of the Lord"]
ˈQuakeress fem n
ˈQuakerish adj
ˈQuakerism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Quak•er

(ˈkweɪ kər)

n.
a member of the Society of Friends, a Christian denomination founded by George Fox in 1650; Friend.
[1650–60; orig. pejorative; alluding to the supposed “shaking and quaking” of participants in early Friends' meetings]
Quak′er•ish, adj.
Quak′er•ism, n.
Quak′er•ly, adj., adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Quaker - a member of the Religious Society of Friends founded by George Fox (the Friends have never called themselves Quakers)Quaker - a member of the Religious Society of Friends founded by George Fox (the Friends have never called themselves Quakers)
Quakers, Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends - a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1660; commonly called Quakers
Christian - a religious person who believes Jesus is the Christ and who is a member of a Christian denomination
2.Quaker - one who quakes and trembles with (or as with) fearquaker - one who quakes and trembles with (or as with) fear
coward - a person who shows fear or timidity
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kvaker
kvæker
kveekari
kveker
クエーカー
퀘이커 교도
kveker
kväkare
นิกายหนึ่งของศาสนาคริสต์ซึ่งเคร่งมาก
tín đồ Quaker

Quaker

[ˈkweɪkəʳ]
A. ADJcuáquero
B. Ncuáquero/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Quaker

[ˈkweɪkər] nquaker(esse) m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Quaker

nQuäker(in) m(f); Quaker schoolQuäkerschule f, → von Quäkern geleitete Schule; Quaker meetingTreffen ntder Quäker; Quaker familyQuäkerfamilie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Quaker

[ˈkweɪkəʳ] nquacchero/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Quaker

مُنْتَسِبٌ لِـجَمَاعَةِ الأَصّحَاب kvaker kvæker Quäker Κουακέρος cuáquero kveekari quaker kveker Quacchero クエーカー 퀘이커 교도 quaker kveker kwakier quacre, quaker квакер kväkare นิกายหนึ่งของศาสนาคริสต์ซึ่งเคร่งมาก Quaker mezhebinden tín đồ Quaker 教友派信徒
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
These two fellows had almost conquered the patience of Jones, when a plain well-looking man (who was indeed a Quaker) accosted him thus: "Friend, I perceive thou hast lost thy way; and if thou wilt take my advice, thou wilt not attempt to find it to-night.
WHEN his little audience next assembled round the chair, Grandfather gave them a doleful history of the Quaker persecution, which began in
On the evening of the autumn day that had witnessed the martyrdom of two men of the Quaker persuasion, a Puritan settler was returning from the metropolis to the neighboring country town in which he resided.
There was nothing so very particular, perhaps, about the appearance of the elderly man I saw; he was brown and brawny, like most old seamen, and heavily rolled up in blue pilot-cloth, cut in the Quaker style; only there was a fine and almost microscopic net-work of the minutest wrinkles interlacing round his eyes, which must have arisen from his continual sailings in many hard gales, and always looking to windward; --for this causes the muscles about the eyes to become pursed together.
She was not in black this morning, for her Aunt Poyser would by no means allow such a risk of incurring bad luck, and had herself made a present of the wedding dress, made all of grey, though in the usual Quaker form, for on this point Dinah could not give way.
The snowy fisse crape cap, made after the strait Quaker pattern,--the plain white muslin handkerchief, lying in placid folds across her bosom,--the drab shawl and dress,--showed at once the community to which she belonged.
Knowing the sentiments of the father in relation to this people, it was no wonder that the son hesitated to avow his connection with, nay, even his dependence on the integrity of, a Quaker.
We immediately went on shore, but found no conveniences just at that place, either for our being on shore or preserving our goods on shore, but was directed by a very honest Quaker, whom we found there, to go to a place about sixty miles east; that is to say, nearer the mouth of the bay, where he said he lived, and where we should be accommodated, either to plant, or to wait for any other place to plant in that might be more convenient; and he invited us with so much kindness and simple honesty, that we agreed to go, and the Quaker himself went with us.
Not any passenger that sailed in the Quaker City will withhold his endorsement of what I have just said.
"Exactly, he is a Quaker, with the exception of the peculiar dress."
But she should be dressed as a nun; I think she looks almost what you call a Quaker; I would dress her as a nun in my picture.
In another minute or two, the distant bathing machines would begin to move, and then the elderly gentlemen of regular habits and sober quaker ladies would be coming to take their salutary morning walks.