Quakerism


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Related to Quakerism: Religious Society of Friends

Quak·er

 (kwā′kər)
n.
A member of the Society of Friends.

[From quake (from an early leader's admonishment to "tremble at the word of the Lord").]

Quak′er·ism n.
Quak′er·ly adv. & adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Quakerism

the principles and beliefs of the Society of Friends, a creedless sect founded in England about 1650 by George Fox, especially its emphasis upon the Inward Light of each believer, its rejection of oaths, and its opposition to all wars. Also Quakerdom, Quakery. (Terms made from quake are never used to or between members of the Society, who prefer Friend or thee.)Quaker, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Quakerism - the theological doctrine of the Society of Friends characterized by opposition to war and rejection of ritual and a formal creed and an ordained ministry
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Quakerism

[ˈkweɪkərɪzəm] Ncuaquerismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Quakerism

nQuäkertum nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
But unlike Captain Peleg --who cared not a rush for what are called serious things, and indeed deemed those selfsame serious things the veriest of all trifles --Captain Bildad had not only been originally educated according to the strictest sect of Nantucket Quakerism, but all his subsequent ocean life, and the sight of many unclad, lovely island creatures, round the Horn --all that had not moved this native born Quaker one single jot, had not so much as altered one angle of his vest.
An institution is the lengthened shadow of one man; as, Monachism, of the Hermit Antony; the Reformation, of Luther; Quakerism, of Fox; Methodism, of Wesley; Abolition, of Clarkson.
Together, these represent a welcome contribution that nuance aspects of MacDowell's life and music, ranging from his youthful relationship to Quakerism and exposure to historical concerts in New York City to his years at Columbia and his wife Marian's founding of the MacDowell Colony shortly before his death.
She finds his departure from the movement to be a significant case study in the contested relationship between Quakerism and Christianity, and ultimately a battle for the spiritual heart of the Religious Society of Friends.
But the overall approach is effective and illuminating, offering valuable insights in each chapter: Rothko's 'counter-idolatrous' thinking was influenced (via Meyer Schapiro) by the astonishing Silos Apocalypse manuscript; McCahon's word-paintings tenaciously mulled over biblical texts; Smithson's mature works were rooted in his earlier mystic Catholicism; Turrell's career has unfolded in productive tension with his Quakerism; Kent's activist pop vernacular was oriented by a deep Catholic faith attuned to Vatican II; and so on.
His wife, fully liberated from Quakerism, entertained relentlessly, dressed extravagantly (many thought provocatively), and flirted.
"I grew up in Quakerism, which doesn't deal with saints at all and yet everybody knows about St.
In the mid-1980s, two historical works on American Quakerism appeared using the term "Reformation": The Reformation of American Quakerism, 1748-1783 by Jack D.
Her husband, Ray, spoke of her journeys into Quakerism and into writing, stressing the importance of her work at the Poetry Business in her creative development.
Born in 1892, Dorothy received a rich and diverse education, typical of those born into the family faith of Quakerism. Kindergarten in Harborne and Edgbaston High School for Girls, was followed with boarding at The Mount School in York.
Quakerism, I argue, offers a belief system that is commensurate with Woolf's expressions of spirituality deeply rooted in the materiality of existence and offers us a way to account for both aspects of her philosophy.