quantum computer

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quantum computer

n.
A computer that exploits the quantum mechanical properties of subatomic particles to allow a single operation to act on a large amount of data.

quantum computer

n
(Computer Science) a type of computer which uses the ability of quantum systems to be in many different states at once, thus allowing it to perform many different computations simultaneously
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They furthermore answer the question of why the quantum algorithm beats any comparable classical circuit: The quantum algorithm exploits the non-locality of quantum physics.
However, Shor's quantum algorithm reveals that the DLP can be solved in polynomial time [2].
In 1994, mathematician Shor has proposed the quantum algorithm [10] by which the integer factorization problem and the discrete logarithm problem can be efficiently solved in polynomial time.
In 1994, Peter Shor invented a fast quantum algorithm for factoring numbers.
"The massive processing capabilities found in Quantum computers will challenge our current beliefs around complexity and security," said Michael Brown, CTO at ISARA Corporation, posing the case for 'Quantum safe cryptography', which is resistant to quantum algorithm attack.
"A good example of this is giving users the ability to tune the quantum algorithm to improve application performance."
Shor [17] proposed the first quantum algorithm based on the quantum concurrent computation in 1994 and used it to solve the large prime factorization.
Quantum algorithm can solve some classical nonpolynomial problems in polynomial time and has many advantages of the superposition, coherence, and entanglement of the quantum state.
Recently, a quantum encryption algorithm has been proposed but it has been noticed that the quantum encryption algorithm is very similar to the classical encryption algorithm with the crucial difference that the quantum algorithm is based on quantum laws whilst the classical algorithms are based on mathematical ones [4-7].
Considering that Shor's quantum algorithm and its extension work well over some commutative groups, such as the multiplication group [Z.sup.*.sub.n], the multiplication group [F.sup.*.sub.q], and the addition group over elliptic curves on finite field [F.sub.q], and we have already known efficient quantum algorithms for hidden group problems (HSP) over all commutative groups, a lot of attempts on developing cryptosystems are based on noncommutative algebraic structures.