uncertainty principle

(redirected from Quantum uncertainty)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Quantum uncertainty: Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

uncertainty principle

n.
A principle in quantum mechanics holding that greater accuracy of measurement for one observable quantity entails less accuracy of measurement for another conjugate quantity.

uncertainty principle

n
(General Physics) the principle that energy and time or position and momentum of a quantum mechanical system, cannot both be accurately measured simultaneously. The product of their uncertainties is always greater than or of the order of h, where h is the Planck constant. Also known as: Heisenberg uncertainty principle or indeterminacy principle

uncer′tainty prin`ciple


n.
the quantum-mechanical principle, formulated by Heisenberg, that measuring either of two related quantities, as position and momentum or energy and time, produces uncertainty in measurement of the other.
[1930–35]

un·cer·tain·ty principle

(ŭn-sûr′tn-tē)
A principle in quantum mechanics stating that it is impossible to measure both the position and the momentum of very small particles (such as electrons) at the same time with accuracy. According to this principle, the more accurately the position of a small particle is known, the less accurately its mass and velocity can be known, and the more accurately its mass and velocity are known, the less accurately its position can be known. The uncertainty principle and the theory of relativity form the basis of modern physics.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.uncertainty principle - (quantum theory) the theory that it is impossible to measure both energy and time (or position and momentum) completely accurately at the same time
scientific theory - a theory that explains scientific observations; "scientific theories must be falsifiable"
quantum theory - (physics) a physical theory that certain properties occur only in discrete amounts (quanta)
Translations

uncertainty principle

n (Phys) → Unbestimmtheits- or Ungenauigkeits- or Unschärferelation f
References in periodicals archive ?
It is important to realize that this quantum uncertainty is not a shortcoming of measurement equipment or engineering, but rather how our brains work, says Deffner.
It is important to realize that this 'quantum uncertainty' is not a shortcoming of measurement equipment or engineering, but rather how our brains work.
Gosson (University of Vienna) proposes new concepts from symplectic topology as the proper setup for a better understanding of the twilight zone between quantum and classical properties, and shows how symplectic geometry and its topological extensions allow physicists to state and prove a classical multi-dimensional uncertainty principle formally similar to the quantum uncertainty relations.
This means that there might exist some kind of mechanism which acts against the quantum uncertainty and damps out or neutralizes the quantum effect.
In this liquid, quantum uncertainty traces its origin (e.g., atoms) according to the Heisenberg uncertainty relation [2, 17] are starting to significantly exceed the current mutual distances between them.
Gamboa, "Quantum uncertainty in doubly special relativity," Physical Review D, vol.
The recognition of the "action" [e.sup.2]/c as an intrinsic property of the fabric of spacetime inevitably leads to quantum uncertainty at a more fundamental level than Planck's constant, in the analogous form
Here, Stoppard does follow quantum uncertainty much closer to its logical and uncertain end.
"Our new results with keeping the atoms in the excited state for a very long time give us better control of the electrons jumping between orbits and this means that the quantum uncertainty is reduced.
The 37 papers examine such topics as quantum uncertainty and decision making in game theory, self-collapses of quantum systems and brain activities, entangled effects of two consecutive pairs in residues and their use in alignment, sufficient algebraic conditions for identifying quantum states, phase transitions in quantum Markov chains on Cayley trees, the electron reservoir hypothesis for two-dimensional electrons, and predicting botulinum toxin structure based on in silico and in vitro analysis.
A common theme in much of this work is that human behaviours are often probabilistic because they are analogous to quantum uncertainty, if not entirely random, and that our attempts to tease out regular patterns in such behaviours are often statistical constructs of dubious reliability.
It needs inputs from our streams of consciousness that act in specified ways in the physically described world in order to cut the burgeoning possibilities arising from the quantum uncertainty principle back down to the complexes of possible human experience of the kind that lie in the domain of applicability of the theory.

Full browser ?