Quaternary period


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Related to Quaternary period: Tertiary period, Neogene Period

Quaternary period

The second (present) period of the Cenozoic era: 2 million to the present.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Quaternary period - last 2 million yearsQuaternary period - last 2 million years      
Age of Mammals, Cenozoic, Cenozoic era - approximately the last 63 million years
Holocene, Holocene epoch, Recent, Recent epoch - approximately the last 10,000 years
Pleistocene, Pleistocene epoch, Glacial epoch - from two million to 11 thousand years ago; extensive glaciation of the northern hemisphere; the time of human evolution
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References in periodicals archive ?
The surface of the territory of Lithuania and surficial geological surroundings which are relevant from an engineering point of view formed during the Quaternary period. The most important feature of the Quaternary is a glacial period.
SOURCE: GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA * THE QUATERNARY PERIOD IS NOT TO SCALE.
The cave was formed due to tectonic motions, probably in the Quaternary period."Currently, we are in the research and documentation phase.
According to Meilan Solly of the Smithsonian, the earth is "currently situated in the Phanerozoic Eon, Cenozoic Era, Quaternary Period, Holocene Epoch and Meghalayan Age."
Prevalence of enamel hypoplasia indicates the existence of stress episodes and percentage displays the comparative intensity of these stresses in the Neogene and Quaternary period of the Siwalik region.
Haikou is home to dozens of volcanoes from the Quaternary period, which allowing visitors to spend more time outside at Haikou Volcanic Cluster Global Geopark during the less torrid season.
The youngest clays originate from the glacial lakes of the last glacial period that date back to the Quaternary Period (11,500 years ago).
We are still in the Quaternary Period. Are we still in the Quaternary Period?
The Earth has passed through several ice ages in the 2.6 million-year history of the Quaternary Period, with the most recent one peaking about 21,000 years ago and ending approximately 12,000 years ago.
Apatite fission-track dating of variable lithological types of crystalline rocks from the Karakoram Metamorphic Complex and the Karakoram Batholith gives evidence of an increasing significance of erosion rates from the period of a slow rate (Upper Miocene to Pliocene) to the Quaternary period of a relative rapid rate.

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