Quechuan


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Quech·uan

 (kĕch′wən)
n.
A group of languages spoken by indigenous peoples of the Andes highlands from southern Colombia to northern Chile.
adj.
Of or relating to the Quechua or their language or culture.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Quechuan - the language of the Quechua which was spoken by the Incas
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Adj.1.Quechuan - of or relating to the Quechua or their language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, we visited Puka Pukara, translated from the Quechuan as the "Red Fortress," with its view of the valley and lime-rich rocks that seem to glow red at dusk.
Some languages, such as Quechuan, spoken in South America, have grammatical evidentials which provide the source of information without offering epistemic judgement (Aikhenvald 2004).
(3) The languages of each set are taken from the following groupings: Bantu, Germanic, Quechuan, Semitic.
Aynah (pronounced: "eye-nah") is a Quechuan (native language of Peru) word meaning "Today for you, tomorrow for me." It was chosen as the name of the organization because it represents the mission of a cooperative learning exchange between students and communities around the world.
The conquistadors forced the local Quechuan Indians to dig corkscrewing tunnels deep under the surface, and little about the mining methods has changed ever since: drill, blast, shovel, and haul.
The Little Hummingbird, published in 201 0 by D&M imprint Greystone Books, retold and illustrated by Yahgulanaas, is based on a South American narrative from the Quechuan tradition.
of Hawaii) and Grondona (Eastern Michigan U.) have brought together 11 contributions pertaining to the history, classification, and endangerment of the indigenous languages of South America as well as typological characteristics, phonetics and phonology, and some specifics of Chibchan languages, the Cariban family, Tupian, Quechuan and Aymaran, and languages of the Chaco and southern cone.
The population of Peru ranges from approximately 29,180,900 people which have a large indigenous population that consist primarily of 'Quechuan and Aymara' cultures.
Glamis's opponents argued that the proposed mine would destroy portions of the Trail of Dreams and other areas used by the Native Quechuan people for ceremonial and educational purposes.
"For example in languages, there can be greater utility or status in speaking Spanish instead of the dying language Quechuan in Peru, and similarly there's some kind of status or utility in being a member of a religion or not," he said.