Queen Anne


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Related to Queen Anne: Queen Anne Boleyn

Queen Anne

n.
1. A style in English and American furniture developed during the reign of Queen Anne (1702-1714) and characterized by sturdiness, comfort, and curved structural elements such as cabriole legs.
2.
a. The style of architecture typical of the reign of Queen Anne, characterized by a fusion of late Renaissance and baroque elements.
b. A British and American architectural style of the late 1800s, characterized by asymmetrical facades and by eclectic and often profuse ornamentation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Queen′ Anne′


adj.
of or pertaining to an early 18th-century English style of architecture and furnishings, characterized by simplicity and restraint, with the use in architecture of red brick and in furniture of walnut, upholstery, cabriole legs, and simple curved lines.
[1765–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Queen Anne

An early eighteenth-century English baroque style characterized by fine upholstery and wood inlays. Key elements included the cabriole leg; the drop handle; figured walnut veneering; fiddleback chair backs; and minimal carved decoration. Better joinery eliminated stretchers. New forms introduced were the china (display) cabinet, the spoonback chair for more comfort, and the card table, the tea table, and the kneehole desk.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in classic literature ?
He had always been afraid of them from the time, himself a lad of seventeen, when Queen Anne, of Juneau, made open and ridiculous love to him.
It was in Queen Anne's time that the bone was in its glory, the farthingale being then all the fashion.
QUEEN ANNE, in her letter of the 1st July, 1706, to the Scotch Parliament, makes some observations on the importance of the UNION then forming between England and Scotland, which merit our attention.
I owe you a grudge, Queen Anne. I really ought to hate you and instead I love you madly, and I'm miserable if I don't see you every day.
This was the accession of the Elector of Hanover to the throne of England, in 1714, on the death of Queen Anne. Hitherto the people had been in continual dread that the male line of the Stuarts, who were descended from the beheaded King Charles and the banished King James, would be restored to the throne.
He had a beautiful old house in Queen Anne Street, and being a man of taste he had furnished it admirably.
if Rosa had only conversed about the tulip, Cornelius would have preferred her to Queen Semiramis, to Queen Cleopatra, to Queen Elizabeth, to Queen Anne of Austria; that is to say, to the greatest or most beautiful queens whom the world has seen.
But when King William died and Queen Anne ruled in his stead Defoe fell on evil times.
Have you never heard that Queen Anne of Austria was once saved from the greatest danger ever incurred by a queen?"
Sir Pitt Crawley (named after the great Commoner) was the son of Walpole Crawley, first Baronet, of the Tape and Sealing-Wax Office in the reign of George II., when he was impeached for peculation, as were a great number of other honest gentlemen of those days; and Walpole Crawley was, as need scarcely be said, son of John Churchill Crawley, named after the celebrated military commander of the reign of Queen Anne. The family tree (which hangs up at Queen's Crawley) furthermore mentions Charles Stuart, afterwards called Barebones Crawley, son of the Crawley of James the First's time; and finally, Queen Elizabeth's Crawley, who is represented as the foreground of the picture in his forked beard and armour.
[A continuation of the state of England under Queen Anne. The character of a first minister of state in European courts.]
It was so called from a notion that prevailed from the reign of Edward the Confessor to that of Queen Anne that it could be cured by the royal touch.