Queneau


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Queneau

(French kəno)
n
(Biography) Raymond (rɛmɔ̃). 1903–76. French writer, influenced in the 1920s by surrealism. His novels include Zazie dans le métro (1959)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Queneau was acquainted with Jean Wahl, professor of philosophy at the Sorbonne (where Queneau studied philosophy between 1921 and 1926) and author of Etudes kierkegaardiennes (1944).
Leconte prefers French novelists like wordsmith Raymond Queneau ("my spiritual father," he calls him), whose quirky "Zazie in the Metro" became a 1960 Louis Malle movie and inspired "Amelie" director Pierre Jeunet.
Founded in 1960 by the Surrealist-influenced writer Raymond Queneau and mathematician Francois Le Lionnais, the Ouvroir de Litterature Potentielle (or Workshop for Potential Literature) devised experiments that, paradoxically, seek to liberate expression by imposing limitations.
As well, one cannot help comparing Queneau's "visage de brie" (Petite cosmogonie portative) to Calvino, who also compared lunar milk to "una specie di ricotta." (5) At a thematic level, the humor in this part produces a demystifying effect on several levels.
Austin; the reason why her friend Raymond Queneau was demobbed as early as 1940; how and by whom Frank Thompson was fatally betrayed in Bulgaria; her first response to America when she lectured at Yale in 1959; how she nearly drowned in the early 1960s; her important friendships with the Canadian painter Alex Colville and with the philosopher Richard Wollheim.
ALEXANDRE KOJEVE DEEPLY INFLUENCED French intellectuals through his Pads seminar (1933-39) on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit, from which, thanks to novelist Raymond Queneau, came a book (1947).
First she touches a magazine entitled Le Cinema which bears a cover photo of Catherine Demongeot, the young actress who had played the precocious, pre-pubescent title character in Zazie dans le Metro (1960), Louis Malle's adaptation of the Raymond Queneau novel.
Naming and Unnaming: On Raymond Queneau. University of Nebraska Press.
[2] In French, significant examples range from medieval times (with the Chevalier du papegau) right down to the very recent past, with Queneau's Zazie dans le metro (1959), Jean Echenoz's Cherokee (1983) or Denis Guedj's Le Theoreme du perroquet (1998).
Charbonnier (Gallimard, 1962), Queneau developed the idea that poetry, contrary to current language, begins with information: "To know how to say it's raining when it's nice outside and that it's nice outside when it's raining [ldots] but that's a bit what poetry is, after all, to pronounce on phenomena that aren't immediately perceptible."