Quercus agrifolia


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Noun1.Quercus agrifolia - highly variable often shrubby evergreen oak of coastal zone of western North America having small thick usually spiny-toothed dark-green leavesQuercus agrifolia - highly variable often shrubby evergreen oak of coastal zone of western North America having small thick usually spiny-toothed dark-green leaves
live oak - any of several American evergreen oaks
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References in periodicals archive ?
It then moved via windblown rain into adjacent forests, taking hold in several areas along the Pacific coast and killing millions of tanoaks (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) and coast live oaks (Quercus agrifolia) (Rizzo et al.
When we encountered the birds initially, the attacking towhees were descending on the scrub-jay from a coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia), landing on the hood of a parked car.
En este caso es asi, con la notoria excepcion del arbol de encino, Quercus agrifolia, omnipresente en todos los sitios que visitamos y que en Baja California crece por debajo de los 2000 msnm (Wiggins, 1980:135).
332 123 122 pagodifolia 2003 Chestnut Quercus prinus 2003 272 99 98 Chinkapin Quercus muehlenbergii 2006 311 76 69 Chisos Quercus graciliformis 2005 56 34 43 Coast live Quercus agrifolia 1999 338 58 75 Darlington Quercus hemisphaerica 2002 231 98 108 Dunn Quercus dunnii 1995 95 39 36 Durand Quercus durandii var.
Four particular species seem vulnerable: coast (or Californian) live oak (Quercus agrifolia), California black oak (Quercus kelloggii), Shreve oak (Quercus parvula var.
Acorn woodpeckers (Melanerpes formicivorus), an acorn specialist, lost 6% of their body weight when fed high-tannin, high-lipid coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) acorns for two weeks but were able to maintain their body weight on diets of either low-tannin, low-lipid valley oak (Q.
So far, three species common in coastal woodlands have proved vulnerable: tan oak (Lithocarpus densiflorus), coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia), and black oak (Quercus kelloggii).
For example, after only five years, two coast live oak trees (Quercus agrifolia) reached nearly the same size-- even though one was planted from a 15-gallon can, the other from a 1-gallon can.