Quercus velutina


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Noun1.Quercus velutina - medium to large deciduous timber tree of the eastern United States and southeastern Canada having dark outer bark and yellow inner bark used for tanningQuercus velutina - medium to large deciduous timber tree of the eastern United States and southeastern Canada having dark outer bark and yellow inner bark used for tanning; broad five-lobed leaves are bristle-tipped
oak tree, oak - a deciduous tree of the genus Quercus; has acorns and lobed leaves; "great oaks grow from little acorns"
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References in periodicals archive ?
The 5 most abundant tree species (Table 1) were Quercus alba (1,759), Quercus velutina (1,657), Carya spp.
In the tree stratum, dominant species were Quercus prinus, Pinus echinata, Pinus virginiana, Quercus velutina, and Oxydendrum arboreum.
of DBH, mean Species size sites (range) (in.) Southern red oak (Quercus 19 2 18.0 (12.7-26.1) falcate) Black oak (Quercus velutina) 20 3 16.6 (12.1-29.4) Northern red oak (Quercus rubra) 24 3 19.7 (12.5-30.1) Willow oak (Quercus phellos) 25 2 18.1 (11.7-27.7) Nuttall oak (Quercus nultallii) 24 2 18.0 (12.5-25.1) Cherrybark oak (Quercus.
121 45 72 breviloba 2007 Black Quercus velutina 1989 331 80 100 Blackjack Quercus marilandica 2007 124 122 49 Blue Quercus douglasii 2001 276 112 83 Bluejack Quercus incana [dagger] 87 61 45 2003 Bluejack Quercus incana [dagger] 83 68 45 2003 Bur Quercus macrocarpa 287 90 130 [dagger] 2007 Bur Quercus macrocarpa 287 104 93 [dagger] 2007 Canyon live Quercus chrysolepis 2001 345 69 121 Chapman Quercus chapmanii 1963 85 45 41 Cherrybark Quercus falcata var.
Black Oak (Quercus velutina) - More prevalent in the Appalachians than in NY, black oak is similar in appearance to northern red oak, and it is often difficult to tell them apart.
Dominant trees on the study area were black oak (Quercus velutina), hickory (Carya sp.), green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), sugarberry (Celtis laevigata), pecan (Carya illinoinensis), cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia), bois d'arc (Maclura pomifera), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos), post oak (Quercus stellata), red cedar (Juniperus virginiana), slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) and persimmon (Diospyros virginiana).
The principal species of red oak are Quercus rubra and Quercus falcata, but Quercus velutina, known as black oak, and Quercus shumardii, known as Shumard oak, are among the related species.
Pretreatment conditions: 24-yr old Quercus velutina stand, Missouri; site index = 71 ft.
Sawtimber-size white oak, black oak, (Quercus velutina Lam.), sugar maple, and yellow-poplar comprised the overstory at Transect B, and the understory consisted of sugar maple and American beech.
breviloba, 1999 Black, Quercus velutina, 1989 322 86 105 434 Blackjack, Quercus 144 94 65 254 marilandica, 1996 Blue, Quercus douglasii, 2001 276 112 83 409 Bluejack, Quercus incana, 83 68 45 162 2003* Bluejack, Quercus incana, 87 61 45 159 2003* Bluejack, Quercus incana, 88 56 65 160 [star] 2001* Bur, Quercus macrocarpa, 322 96 103 444 [star] 1980 California black, Quercus 338 124 115 491 kelloggii, [star] 1972 Canyon live, Quercus 345 69 121 444 chrysolepis, 2001 Chapman, Quercus chapmanii, 83 51 57 148 1963 Cherrybark, Quercus falcata 332 123 122 486 var.
Seven species of eastern red oaks growing in Alabama were investigated: southern red oak (Quercus falcata), northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), black oak (Quercus velutina), shumard oak (Quercus shumardii Buck L.), willow oak (Quercus phellos L.), laurel oak (Quercus laurifolia), and water oak (Quercus nigra L.).