cholestyramine

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Related to Questran: Questran Light

cho·le·styr·a·mine

 (kō′lĭ-stîr′ə-mēn′, kō-lĕs′tə-răm′ēn)
n.
A drug that binds to intestinal bile acids and promotes their excretion, used to lower serum cholesterol levels and to treat itching associated with partial biliary obstruction.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cholestyramine

(ˌkɒlɪˈstaɪərəˌmiːn)
n
(Pharmacology) a drug that reduces and prevents re-absorption of bile in the body
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

cholestyramine

n colestiramina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rats were given cholesterol, African black pepper and Beniseed extracts at two different doses and Questran five times a week for 28 days.
(164,165) Chitosan acts similarly to the bile acid sequestrants cholestyramine (Questran) and colesevelam (Welchol), (166) preventing the absorption of lipids by effectively binding to bile salts, (167) but most importantly where detoxification is concerned, removing the many conjugated toxins excreted in the bile.
Rats were given cholesterol (40 mg/0.3ml), PG and SI extract (100 and 200 mg/kg), and Questran (0.26 g/kg) orally, five times a week for 28 days.
The BAS include colesevelam (Welchol, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Tokyo, Japan), colestipol (Colestid, Pfizer Inc, New York, New York), and cholestyramine (LoCholest, Warner Chilcott Inc, Rockaway, New Jersey; Prevalite, Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Maple Grove, Minnesota; and Questran, Par Pharmaceutical, Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey).
Bile acid sequestrants include cholestyramine (Prevalite, Questran), colesevelam (Welchol), and colestipol (Colestid).
* Cholesterol-lowering drugs: Colestipol (Colestid), cholestyramine (Questran), and colsevelam (Welchol)
Pfizer's blockbuster cholesterol treatment, Lipitor, has become the world's best-selling drug, and by 2009, cholesterol-lowering medications, including Crestor, Questran and Lescol, were generating sales of more than $25 billion.
The three main bile acid sequestrants currently prescribed in the United States are cholestyramine resin (Questran), colestipol (Colestid) and colesevalam (WelChol).
These include antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium (Maalox, Mylanta); some cholesterol-lowering drugs, including cholestyramine (Questran) and colestipol (Colestid); the heartburn drug metoclopramide (Reglan); sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), which is used to treat ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis; and bulk laxatives (such as psyllium, Metamucil or Citrucel).
The doctor gave Tom three different scripts for medications (Creon Forte, Questran and Ornidazole treatment), with instructions to try one at a time to see if any would make a difference to his bowels.
For example, generally it's best to wait about four hours after taking thyroid medication to consume soy and high-fiber products, iron and calcium supplements, antacids that contain aluminium or magnesium, and certain prescription medications such as cholestyramine (Questran).
Avoid taking the cholesterol-lowering drugs colestipol (Colestid) and cholestyramine (Locholest, Prevalite, Questran) at the same time as you take niacin--take them at least four to six hours before or after you take niacin.