quidditch

(redirected from Quiddich)

quidditch

(ˈkwɪdɪtʃ)
n
(Team Sports, other than specified) an imaginary game in which players fly on broomsticks
[C20: coined by J. K. Rowling in the novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone]
Translations
Quidditch
quidditch
Quidditch
קווידיץ׳
metloboj
Quidditch
metlobal
Quidditch
Quidditch
References in periodicals archive ?
Year 3 even tried a game of Quiddich in the style of Harry Potter - but with their feet firmly on the ground!
To score in Quiddich you throw the quaffle through a hoop, which is classified as a goal, and is worth 10 points.
Huddersfield has more than 100 groups available to join such as American football, the Cuppas and Cocktails Society, a paintballing club and even a Quiddich society.
She added: "We've played bingo and quiddich, seen the owl and played a 'pin the scar on Harry' game and we're going try some butterbeer."
The latter of these two arguments is pure malarkey; college applications are already asking less-than-serious questions about a student's possible interest in a Quiddich club, for example.
The 4D Forbidden Journey ride is sensational, cram packed with stunning special effects, striking visuals, and a fabulous adrenalin fuelled ride behind Harry thorough the Quiddich pitch and beyond.
The Quiddich World Cup, from The Goblet of Fire, because of the brilliant setting and the description of the tent city.
One says he's playing a camp version of Quiddich. Another invites everyone to the water slide.
The author may describe his art historian hero as "Harrison Ford in Harris tweed," but like young Master Potter, Robert Langdon launches readers into the arcane world of religious symbols, mathematical puzzles, and linguistic codes that are as challenging as a fast game of quiddich.
and Taiwan were decorated as Quiddich playing fields, in Taiwan accompanied by whooshing sounds on P.A.
So if I choose Harry Potter and the word was 'quiddich' and I didn't know that--and I put 'q', and then I'd put z or f or n.
The magical world of Hogwarts continues to be as enchanting to the viewer as it is to the still naive Harry, and this provides for no shortage of visual spectacle, in the way of disturbingly baby-like root vegetables that howl their agitation at being unearthed, to a Quiddich match (a game played on flying broomsticks bearing a very slight resemblance to basketball), which may well outdo that of the first film, which was rather spectacular in its own right.