Quito


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Related to Quito: La Paz, Guayaquil

Qui·to

 (kē′tō)
The capital of Ecuador, in the north-central part of the country. Settled by the Quito people, it was captured by the Incas in 1487 and held by the Spanish from 1534 until 1822. The city has frequently been damaged by earthquakes.

Quito

(ˈkiːtəʊ; Spanish ˈkito)
n
(Placename) the capital of Ecuador, in the north at an altitude of 2850 m (9350 ft), just south of the equator: the oldest capital in South America, existing many centuries before the Incan conquest in 1487; a cultural centre since the beginning of Spanish rule (1534); two universities. Pop: 1 514 000 (2005 est)

Qui•to

(ˈki toʊ)

n.
the capital of Ecuador, in the N part. 1,110,248; 9348 ft. (2849 m) above sea level.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Quito - the capital of EcuadorQuito - the capital of Ecuador    
Ecuador, Republic of Ecuador - a republic in northwestern South America; became independent from Spain in 1822; the landscape is dominated by the Andes
Translations

Quito

[ˈkiːtəʊ] NQuito m

Quito

[ˈkiːtəʊ] nQuito

Quito

[ˈkiːtəʊ] nQuito f
References in classic literature ?
"But next morning when we came to pull out for Quito with a dozen flat cars loaded with rails, there she was in the cab waiting for us; and in the daylight I could see how much better a looker she was than the night before.
"And the moment we pulled into Quito, she did what she'd done before--vanished.
Now, I'm not telling you its particular shape, but when you and I head out for it from Quito I'll take you straight to it.
Then it was doctors at Quito, and Paloma nursing me
Some days elapsed, and ice and icebergs all astern, the Pequod now went rolling through the bright Quito spring, which, at sea, almost perpetually reigns on the threshold of the eternal August of the Tropic.
And though now nailed amidst all the rustiness of iron bolts and the verdigris of copper spikes, yet, untouchable and immaculate to any foulness, it still preserved its Quito glow.
A number had gone to Panama, and four were talking of going to Ecuador to work in the shops of the railroad that ran over the Andes to Quito.
The inhabitants are between two and three hundred in number; they are nearly all people of colour, who have been banished for political crimes from the Republic of the Equator, of which Quito is the capital.
I think she liked John Harned before he followed her to Quito to see the bull-fight.
More men were killed that day because of John Harned than were ever killed in all the history of the bull-ring of Quito, yes, and of Guayaquil and all Ecuador.
But John Harned followed Maria Valenzuela to Quito, and it was quickly clear to us--to Luis Cervallos and me that she looked upon John Harned with great kindness.
"I will give one thousand sucres to the lazar-house of Quito if a bull kills a man this day."