RNA polymerase


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Related to RNA polymerase: RNA polymerase II

RNA polymerase

n.
A polymerase that catalyzes the synthesis of a complementary strand of RNA from a DNA template, or, in some viruses, from an RNA template.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

RNA polymerase


n.
an enzyme that synthesizes the formation of RNA from a DNA template during transcription.
[1960–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.RNA polymerase - the enzyme that copies DNA into RNA
polymerase - an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of new DNA and RNA from an existing strand of DNA or RNA
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ARN polymérase
References in periodicals archive ?
The provided abundant recombinant Sudan ebolavirus antibodies target at the L (an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and a component of viral polymerase complex) and GP (toxic protein) of EBOV, of which the peptide sequences correspond to the important amio acid residues like TRSFTTHFL, MSDIFHALV, GFKLRSAVM, and TTLPSQNST, etc.
RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), the enzyme that produces RNA from a DNA template, can become stuck due to damage to the DNA template, and these jams must be cleared to restore gene expression and normal cell function.
Sofosbuvir, a nucleotide inhibitor of viral NS5B RNA polymerase has been approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, in combination with other drugs and its approval represents the first key step towards the new era in the treatment of CHC patients, since it is the first approved DAA with potent activity and high genetic barrier against all HCV genotypes13.
The first step in gene expression is the binding to DNA of an enzyme called RNA polymerase. This binding occurs at very particular sites of the DNA, that are "recognized"by the RNA polymerase.
His research focuses on the mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase I.
He identified several subunits of a protein complex called RNA polymerase III--which plays an important role in copying DNA into RNA--among those that were affected.
Adding (literally) a layer of complexity here is that promoters don't directly bind RNA polymerase. Instead, they contain shorter sub-sequences, which are recognized as binding sites for a class of proteins known as transcription factors (TFs); there are a great many of these, each with their own preferred DNA sequence binding site (usually short, 10-20 base pairs) and their own level of ability to recruit in RNA polymerase.
The technique is used to study biological systems, including DNA and molecular motors like RNA polymerase, an enzyme responsible for copying DNA.
This volume reviews the features of cyanobacterial genetic systems responsible for acclimation to a changing environment, including the two-component regulatory system, eukaryotic-type serine-threonine protein kinases, sigma subunits of RNA polymerase, transcription factors, and other regulators and gene expression in response to various factors.
Vannini explained that RNA polymerase and its helper molecules are "often overactive in cancer because cancer cells rely on a large number of protein building blocks to rapidly grow and divide."
Promoter-specific mRNA synthesis requires a minimal set of proteins comprising Pol II (RNA polymerase II) and associated GTFs (general transcription factors), which is defined as in vitro "basal transcription" [1].