reverse transcriptase

(redirected from RNA-directed DNA polymerase)
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reverse transcriptase

n.
A polymerase that catalyzes the formation of DNA on an RNA template, found in the retroviruses and in certain other viruses, such as hepatitis B virus.

reverse transcriptase

(trænˈskrɪpteɪz)
n
(Biochemistry) an enzyme present in retroviruses that copies RNA into DNA, thus reversing the usual flow of genetic information in which DNA is copied into RNA

reverse′ tran•scrip′tase

(trænˈskrɪp teɪs, -teɪz)
n.
a retrovirus enzyme that synthesizes DNA from viral RNA, the reverse of the usual DNA-to-RNA replication: used in genetic engineering.
[1970–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reverse transcriptase - a polymerase that catalyzes the formation of DNA using RNA as a template; found especially in retroviruses
polymerase - an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of new DNA and RNA from an existing strand of DNA or RNA
References in periodicals archive ?
The most sensitive assays developed to date have exploited the RNA-directed DNA polymerase activity of the enzyme.
The RNA-directed DNA polymerase assay was a modification of methods described by Goff et al.