RNVR


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RNVR

abbreviation for
(Nautical Terms) Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
References in periodicals archive ?
Able Seaman Horace Joseph Neal Hawke Battalion, Royal Naval Division, RNVR Died 29th December 1917, aged 21 Died of wounds.
Brennan (19) shows that the condition specified by Rubinstein is both necessary and sufficient to derive a RNVR and that the same result can be obtained if the risk aversion of the investor is constant absolute and the joint distribution of aggregate wealth and the underlying asset is normal.
(14) RNVR stands for Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve, mostly yachtsmen whose experience of sea matters made them good recruits for the naval reserve.
By employing the Cox-Ross (1976) risk-neutral valuation relation (RNVR), we are able to obtain closed-form (and numerical) solutions.
Eton and Oxford educated, he served aboard destroyers in the Arctic and North Atlantic as an RNVR lieutenant His ship, HMS Tartar, was one of the fleet which hunted the Bismarck in the Atlantic and helped to sink it.
On 12 September 1940, Lieutenant Commander Ian Fleming, RNVR, Personal Assistant to the Director of Naval Intelligence, concocted an extraordinary plan to crash-land a captured German plane in the English Channel and overpower the patrol boat crew that came to rescue its "survivors," thereby gaining access to the much needed code books.
Afterwards the lads chatted to former Fleet Air Arm pilot, and retired local GP Sub Lieutenant (A) Gordon Rider RNVR.
Judge John Roberts, Athenaeum president, with the last piece Nicholas wrote, which was still in his typewriter when he died; Ann Monsarrat with old exhibition photographs of her husband, Nicholas, at their home in Malta; Pamela Brown, the Athenaeum chief executive; RNVR officer Nicholas Monsarrat on board HMS Campanula, during World War II
My shipmate who lived in Coventry is Mr Ray Hartley, he was a sub-lieutenant (RNVR) and our first lieutenant (or Jimmy as he was known below decks).
Among the prisoners was a RNVR Lieutenant named Palmer, who details are difficult to trace, but who may be C F S Palmer, the former British Vice Consul at Kannakale serving on Admiral de Roebeck's staff as an Intelligence Officer and a volunteer crewmember of E15.
On his return to England he transferred into the uniformed service as a sub-lieutenant RNVR and served as a radio operator on a number of frigates based in Derry and Belfast, took part in the invasion of Normandy, and was sunk in HMS Bickerton while on convoy duty to Murmansk.
Christopher says: "To my knowledge, none of the crew of my uncle's ship, LCT 608 in the 41st LCT Flotilla, ever later had any special claim to fame or wrote an autobiography, but not far away from my uncle at that moment, in the same Force S Flotilla, was someone who later became a good friend of mine, the late Commander Rupert Curtis DSC RNVR, and he was carrying Lord Lovat with his famous commandos in a small LCI (a landing craft that carried 85 men).