RNase


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Related to RNase: RNase P, RNase H

RN·ase

 (är′ĕn-ās′, -āz′) also RNA·ase (är′ĕn-ā′ās′, -āz′)

ri•bo•nu•cle•ase

(ˌraɪ boʊˈnu kliˌeɪs, -ˌeɪz, -ˈnyu-)

n.
any of a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of RNA. Also called RNase, RNAase.
[1940–45]
ri`bo•nu•cle′ic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.RNase - a transferase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ribonucleic acid
transferase - any of various enzymes that move a chemical group from one compound to another compound
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the lead molecule, RSLV-132, the company is developing additional molecules that contain both RNase and DNase activities, which may also be useful in the treatment of lupus and other autoimmune diseases resulting from aberrant nucleic acid deposition.
He said that now that they have the human RNase L structure, we can begin to understand the effects of carcinogenic mutations in the RNase L gene.
Lack of removal of many chemical inhibitors, dilution rather than concentration, and lack of removal or inactivation of RNases limit this approach from more general use, but where applicable in a specific context it's simple, cheap, fast, and effective.
The production medium (50-ml in a 250-ml Erlenmeyer flask) was inoculated with 5% of seed culture and flasks were placed on a rotary shaker at 180 rpm with 5 cm amplitude at 30[degrees]C for 120h to produce RNase.
RNase A 5mg/ml (500 [micro]l) is available from Carolina (211745).
To assess the sensitivity to protein amounts, denaturation profiles of bovine pancreatic RNAse A were generated with three different amounts of protein: 10 [micro]g, 1 [micro]g, and 100 ng.
Cheney hypothesizes that CFS moves through three distinct stages that begin when an intracellular organism activates the RNase L pathway.
Parniak, Professor of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and Principal Investigator of this multi-team research effort, has nearly 20 years experience in HIV research and is regarded as a thought leader in the discovery of drugs targeting HIV RNase H.
Kyoto, Japan) and Superscript III (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) lacking RNase H activity, at 50[degrees]C for 1 h.
It encodes an enzyme known as RNase L, which degrades RNA, a chemical relative of DNA.
A complex of RNase A with a transition-state analog, uridine vanadate, was also studied using a combination of neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques (14).