Rabbinic Hebrew


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Rabbinic Hebrew

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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The word wasn't "herring" (which hails from Old High German) but "maven." "Maven" comes from the Yiddish meyvn--"expert" or "connoisseur"--which itself is derived from the Hebrew mebin--"person with understanding." It may be connected to the rabbinic Hebrew expression bamevin yavin--"those who understand will understand," says Northeastern University Jewish studies professor Lori Lefkovitz.
In rabbinic Hebrew aleph-shin-resh means to confirm, attest, validate, as seen in the Talmudic saying, Havrakh mit, asher (with an aleph); itasher (with an ayin, meaning wealth), lo te'asher--"If people say your friend is dead, credit it; if they say he has become rich, don't credit it" (TB Gittin 30b).
Midrash: Jan Joosten and Menahem Kister, "The New Testament and Rabbinic Hebrew"; Menahem Kister, '"First Adam and 'Second Adam in 1 Cor 15:45-49 in the Light of Midrashic Exegesis and Hebrew Usage"; and Miguel Perez Fernandez, "Midrash and the New Testament: A Methodology for the Study of Gospel Midrash."
The Hebrew is generic rabbinic Hebrew, and one may agree with Leopold Zunz's assessment of the language of PRE as dating to the Geonic period.
His books became the fundamental guides to Christian study of biblical and rabbinic Hebrew and of Jewish texts, Judaism, and Jews, until the nineteenth century.
Similar explanations are not given for developments between biblical and modern Hebrew, that is for neo- or rabbinic Hebrew.
The range of Gordon's linguistic endeavors is vast: from biblical and rabbinic Hebrew, to classical Greek and Latin, and on to ancient Aramaic and, above all, Akkadian.
The author notes that Hame'asef's writers and editors deliberately hearkened back to biblical Hebrew in creative writing, as opposed to rabbinic Hebrew, which they regarded as lacking unity.
Thus in Rabbinic Hebrew, the noun drk may mean either "road, path, custom" or "right, prerogative." The coincidence of these two terms also causes ambiguity in Aramaic, which translates both meanings with the word orah.
There are also occasional comments on grammar and vocabulary of the Hebrew text which are completely unnecessary and only reveal the problems of the author with rabbinic Hebrew (e.g., on pp.
However, 4Q269 9 ii 5 reads [Hebrew Text Omitted], which shows that the hifil of [Hebrew Text Omitted] takes [Hebrew Text Omitted] as a direct object, as it does in rabbinic Hebrew; cf.