rabbinite

(redirected from Rabbinic Judaism)
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rabbinite

(ˈræbɪˌnaɪt)
n
a follower of or believer in the teachings of a rabbi
References in periodicals archive ?
Akhiezer explores Eastern European Karaite historical thought, focusing on the social functions of the major Karaite historical narratives concerning theories of Karaism and its relationship with rabbinic Judaism.
Everything about modern Jewish life, from rabbinic Judaism to synagogue worship to the concept of personal prayer all arose in the aftermath of the destruction of both Temples.
Fowden speaks of the "Quran's intense dialogue with rabbinic Judaism and Christianity" (20), and of the interaction between Muslims and Christians (especially Syriac-speaking Christians) over many centuries, which affected the development of both religions.
In general, adherents of Rabbinic Judaism considered Karaites to be sinners, if not heretics.
A significant landmark in this long and complex history is the Latin translation of large sections of the Talmud, the most important Jewish post-biblical text and the basis for the development of Rabbinic Judaism.
1), which "is a somewhat slippery term" referring to the Bible of rabbinic Judaism, the Christian "Old Testament," but not the Apocrypha.
With a couple of exceptions, the authors are scholars of the New Testament or of Rabbinic Judaism.
7) The first point suggests that just as rabbinic Judaism interpreted (by and large) the twenty-four book canon of the Hebrew Bible that we now have, during the late preexilic period (through 586 BCE), prophets and historians had a smaller Torah (without the Priestly material) which they interpreted and treated as authoritative.
Ironically, this is the age old legal or halakhic position of rabbinic Judaism, and yet it bears none of the theological, legal, or spiritual connotations one would expect such a core issue as membership in a faith, or what has been called a covenantal community, to have.
Comment: A novel based on the early days of Rabbinic Judaism in Judea after the destruction of the Second Temple by the Romans.
Together with his remarkable son Abraham, who was born in 1206, they turned the tide for Rabbinic Judaism.
Turning to the rabbinic (post-biblical) period, Eisen correctly writes that "given the history of Jewish subjugation before and during the rabbinic period, it should therefore come as no surprise that rabbinic Judaism would speak badly about non-Jews" (80), while at the same time "whatever dislike the rabbis felt toward non-Jews, that antipathy did not translate into a violent ethic" (81).