Rachel


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Ra·chel

 (rā′chəl)
In the Bible, the second wife of Jacob and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin.

[Hebrew rāḥēl, ewe; see rḫl in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Rachel

n
1. (Bible) Old Testament the second and best-loved wife of Jacob; mother of Joseph and Benjamin (Genesis 29–35)
2. (Biography) original name Elisa Félix. 1820–58, French tragic actress, famous for her roles in the plays of Racine and Corneille
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ra•chel

(ˈreɪ tʃəl)

n.
Jacob's favorite wife, the mother of Joseph and Benjamin. Gen. 29–35.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rachel - (Old Testament) the second wife of Jacob and mother of Joseph and BenjaminRachel - (Old Testament) the second wife of Jacob and mother of Joseph and Benjamin
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Rakel
RachelRahel
Raakel
Rachel
Rachel
Rakel
Rachela
Rakel

Rachel

[ˈreɪtʃəl] NRaquel
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
If any want to get up an inspiration under this head, we refer them to our good friend Rachel Halliday, just as she sits there in her little rocking-chair.
"I will go in tomorrow, and do any cleaning there may be, and look over the mending," said Rachel.
Rachel now took down a snowy moulding-board, and, tying on an apron, proceeded quietly to making up some biscuits, first saying to Mary,--"Mary, hadn't thee better tell John to get a chicken ready?" and Mary disappeared accordingly.
"Oh, Rachel, how d'you do," she said, shaking hands.
Only it struck Helen that Rachel was perhaps too still for a hostess, and that she might have done something with her hands.
Leaning over the rail, side by side, Helen said, "Won't you be cold?" Rachel replied, "No.
An elegant little casket in China accompanied the note, presented to Miss Rachel, with her cousin's love and best wishes.
Franklin's dressing-table, secretly removing a rose which Miss Rachel had given him to wear in his button-hole, and putting another rose like it, of her own picking, in its place.
Franklin Blake's arrival and Miss Rachel's birthday.
Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies' eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the time it reached Lynde's Hollow it was a quiet, well-conducted little stream, for not even a brook could run past Mrs.
Rachel Lynde was one of those capable creatures who can manage their own concerns and those of other folks into the bargain.
Thomas Lynde-- a meek little man whom Avonlea people called "Rachel Lynde's husband"--was sowing his late turnip seed on the hill field beyond the barn; and Matthew Cuthbert ought to have been sowing his on the big red brook field away over by Green Gables.