radicant


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radicant

(ˈrædɪkənt)
adj
producing roots from the stem
References in periodicals archive ?
Species characterization and statistical analysis: We used the four-part climbing mechanism classification of Hergarty and Caballe (1991): 1) Apical twining: apically winding stems that continuously wrap around the host; 2) Tendrilling: bearing tendrils, a determinate coiling organ derived from leaflets, stipules, petioles, axillary buds, or inflorescence axes; 3) Scandent: bearing hooked spines or thorns only; or 4) Radicant: bearing roots adapted to adhere to the host.
I've been reading Nicolas Bourriaud's The Radicant [2009], which deals with exactly these questions.
Richard Owens identifies "professional courtesy" as my target in the essay, and that's fair enough as a reading: I use the term "courtesy" as I found it in Nicolas Bourriaud's The Radicant. I find it helpful in explaining what I take to be an insufficiently reflective or critical pluralism on view in the introductions to American Hybrid and elsewhere in some of the discourse about American poetry today.
At the same time, their work has little use for what, on the evidence of American Hybrid and lots of other publications, is pervasive: an aesthetic "courtesy" that "consists of refusing to pass critical judgment for fear of ruffling the sensitivity of the other," to borrow a phrase from Nicolas Bourriaud's The Radicant.
Nicolas Bourriaud, "Victor Segalen and the Twenty-First-Century Creole," The Radicant, trans.
In his most recent book, The Radicant (Sterberg Press, 2009), he defines his title neologism thus: "To be radicant means setting one's roots in motion." Per Bourriaud, radicant artists remap the present as a field of temporal and spatial dislocations.
RESUMEN | Somos territoriantes, radicantes, transumers, viajeros en la ciudad global.