radiometric dating

(redirected from Radioisotope dating)
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Related to Radioisotope dating: carbon dating

radiometric dating

n.
A method for determining the age of an object based on the concentration of a particular radioactive isotope contained within it and the half-life of that isotope.

radiometric dating

n
(Archaeology) any method of dating material based on the decay of its constituent radioactive atoms, such as potassium-argon dating or rubidium-strontium dating. Also called: radioactive dating

ra′diomet′ric dat′ing


n.
any method of determining the age of earth materials or objects of organic origin based on measurement of either short-lived radioactive elements or the amount of a long-lived radioactive element plus its decay product.
[1965–70]

ra·di·o·met·ric dating

(rā′dē-ō-mĕt′rĭk)
A method for determining the age of an object based on the concentration of a particular radioactive isotope contained within it. The amount of the isotope in the object is compared to the amount of the isotope's decay products. The object's approximate age can then be figured out using the known rate of decay of the isotope. Radiocarbon dating is one kind of radiometric dating, used for determining the age of organic remains that are less than 50,000 years old. For inorganic matter and for older materials, isotopes of other elements, such as potassium, uranium, and strontium, are used.

radiometric dating

Dating rocks by the known rate of decay of radioactive elements that they contain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radioisotope dating showed that the sediments recorded 2,100 years of sea level history, the researchers report online June 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
In 1997, the Institute of Creation Research (ICR) and the Creation Research Society initiated an eight-year research program to investigate the validity of radioisotope dating of rocks.
By using radioisotope dating, a technique that measures the gradual decline in radioactivity of the calcium carbonate deposits.