rad

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rad 1

 (răd)
n.
A unit of energy absorbed from ionizing radiation, equal to 100 ergs per gram or 0.01 joule per kilogram of irradiated material. It has been replaced as a standard scientific unit by the gray.

[r(adiation) a(bsorbed) d(ose).]

rad 2

 (răd)
adj. Slang
Excellent; wonderful.

[Short for radical.]

rad 3

abbr.
radian

rad

(ræd)
n
(Units) a former unit of absorbed ionizing radiation dose equivalent to an energy absorption per unit mass of 0.01 joule per kilogram of irradiated material. 1 rad is equivalent to 0.01 gray
[C20: shortened from radiation]

rad

symbol for
(Units) radian

rad1

(ræd)

n. Physics.
a unit of absorbed dose equal to 0.01 Gy. Compare dose (def. 4).
[1915–20; shortening of radiation]

rad2

(ræd)

n.
1. Informal. a radical.
adj.
2. Slang. fine; wonderful.
[1820–30; shortening of radical]

rad


Math.
radian.

rad.


Math.
1. radical.
2. radix.

rad

(răd)
A unit used to measure energy absorbed by a material from radiation. One rad is equal to 100 ergs per gram of material. Many scientists now measure this energy in grays rather than in rads.

rad

1. A unit of radiation absorbed from a radioactive source.
2. A short form of radian, a unit of measure for plane angles. See centrad.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rad - a unit of absorbed ionizing radiation equal to 100 ergs per gram of irradiated material
radioactivity unit - a measure of radioactivity
2.rad - the unit of plane angle adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites; equal to the angle at the center of a circle subtended by an arc equal in length to the radius (approximately 57.295 degrees)
angular unit - a unit of measurement for angles
milliradian - a unit of angular distance equal to one thousandth of a radian
References in classic literature ?
Rad wanted to do it all alone, but Koku said he was like a baby now.
If old Rad were here now, I'd tell him to jump overboard and scatter 'em.
The average dose to the 160 million people living in the United States at the time was about 2 rads, about five times the dose given in a modern mammogram.