rafter

(redirected from Rafters)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

raft·er 1

 (răf′tər)
n.
One who travels by raft.

raf·ter 2

 (răf′tər)
n.
One of the sloping beams that supports a pitched roof.

[Middle English, from Old English ræfter.]

raf′tered adj.

raf·ter 3

(răf′tər)
n.
A group or flock, especially of wild turkeys.

[Probably raft + -er.]

rafter

(ˈrɑːftə)
n
(Building) any one of a set of sloping beams that form the framework of a roof
[Old English ræfter; related to Old Saxon rehter, Old Norse raptr, Old High German rāvo; see raft1]

raf•ter1

(ˈræf tər, ˈrɑf-)

n.
any of a series of timbers or the like, usu. having a pronounced slope, for supporting the sheathing and covering of a roof.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English rǣfter; c. Middle Low German rafter, Old Norse raptr. compare raft1]

raft•er2

(ˈræf tər, ˈrɑf-)

n.
a person who travels on a raft.
[1975–80; raft1 + -er1]

Rafter

 a large and of ten motley collection of people and things.
Example: rafter of turkeys.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rafter - one of several parallel sloping beams that support a roofrafter - one of several parallel sloping beams that support a roof
beam - long thick piece of wood or metal or concrete, etc., used in construction
2.rafter - someone who travels by raftrafter - someone who travels by raft    
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
Verb1.rafter - provide (a ceiling) with rafters
architecture - the profession of designing buildings and environments with consideration for their esthetic effect
furnish, provide, supply, render - give something useful or necessary to; "We provided the room with an electrical heater"

rafter

noun
A large, oblong piece of wood or other material, used especially for construction:
Translations
رافِدَه
krokev
tagspær
szarufa
sperra
gegnė
spāre
krokva
çatı kirişi

rafter

[ˈrɑːftəʳ] Nviga f, cabrio m
the rafters (loosely) → el techo

rafter

[ˈrɑːftər] n [roof] → chevron m

rafter

n(Dach)sparren m

rafter

[ˈrɑːftəʳ] ntrave f (del tetto), puntone m (Archit)

rafter

(ˈraːftə) noun
a beam supporting the roof of a house.
References in classic literature ?
The walls were unplastered and the rafters unceiled; the whole bearing a most barnlike and unhospitable appearance.
It was a very small stuffy fusty room, with boards, and rafters, and cobwebs, and lath and plaster.
The rafters were soon eased of their burden; venison and beef were passed out to the crew before the door, and a scene of gormandizing commenced, of which few can have an idea, who have not witnessed the gastronomic powers of an Indian, after an interval of fasting.
In futile rage Muda Saffir called down the most terrible curses of Allah and his Prophet upon the head of Ninaka and his progeny to the fifth generation, and upon the shades of his forefathers, and upon the grim skulls which hung from the rafters of his long-house.
The monotonous and vibrating note was destined to grow into the intimacy of the heart, pass into blood and bone, accompany the thoughts and acts of two full decades, remain to haunt like a reproach the peace of the quiet fireside, and enter into the very texture of respectable dreams dreamed safely under a roof of rafters and tiles.
Yet therein was usually to be found his favourite crony and gossip, Ngurn, always willing for a yarn or a discussion, the while he sat in the ashes of death and in a slow smoke shrewdly revolved curing human heads suspended from the rafters.
But to return to the house: after he had pitched the roof of his innermost tent, he worked it up between the rafters with basket-work, so firm, and thatched that over again so ingeniously with rice-straw, and over that a large leaf of a tree, which covered the top, that his house was as dry as if it had been tiled or slated.
James said the roof and floor had all fallen in, and that only the black walls were standing; the two poor horses that could not be got out were buried under the burnt rafters and tiles.
Old Hundred swelled up with a triumphant burst, and while it shook the rafters Tom Sawyer the Pirate looked around upon the envying juveniles about him and confessed in his heart that this was the proudest moment of his life.
The rafters, I observed, were made out of the timbers of a ship.
The constant vapour which this occasioned, had polished the rafters and beams of the low-browed hall, by encrusting them with a black varnish of soot.
The lodge was a ruin of black granite and bared ribs of rafters, but facing it was a new building, half constructed, the first fruit of Sir Charles's South African gold.