Rahv

Rahv

(rɑv)
n.
Philip, 1908–73, U.S. literary critic, born in Russia.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 1939, the Partisan Review published Philip Rahv's "Twilight of the Thirties," an indictment of Popular Front politics in which he blames the "withering away of literature" and intellectual freedom on the cultural production of a "new nationalism, this bombast about the 'American way of life,' this so-called 'rediscovery of our democratic past'" (1939, 10).
As a young man, delving into Schwartz's life with only a partial idea of what he was doing, Atlas was nonetheless able to meet many of his fast-vanishing heroes from the New York literary world who had inspired him to become a critic in the first place: Philip Rahv, Dwight Macdonald, Alfred Kazin--giants who held sway over American culture in a bygone, arguably more literate age.
In Commentary Philip Rahv called the novel "egregiously bad." In the Saturday Review, Maxwell Geismar labeled it "Hemingway's worst." In The New Yorker, Alfred Kazin declared that Hemingway had made "a travesty of himself." Carlos Baker would later summarize the critical reception as a mixture of "boredom and dismay" (xiv-xv).
How useful a descriptor is "Neoplatonism" if it can reasonably encompass such vastly dissimilar critics as William Wordsworth, Philip Rahv, and Allan Bloom?
Its very first issue, which the New Yorker called "surely the best first issue of any magazine ever," featured pieces by Norman Mailer, Irving Howe, Philip Rahv, Susan Sontag, Alfred Kazin, and other literary heavyweights, immediately establishing itself as a publication of literary and cultural criticism on par with the original iterations of Commentary, Dissent, the Partisan Review, and the like.
American Trotskyists and pacifists, men like Dwight Macdonald and Philip Rahv, regarded him as an honest man and not an apologist for either Stalinism or capitalism.
Dupee, Irving Howe, Norman Podhoretz, Alfred Kazin, Diana and Lionel Trilling, Leslie Fiedler, Dwight Macdonald, Philip Rahv, William Phillips, William Barrett, and Mailer's undergraduate writing professor at Harvard, Robert Gorham Davis.
However, she also moved into the territory of writers and critics who were all closely allied with the RF programs to cultivate and protect high literature, including the New York group associated with Partisan Review (Trilling, Rahv, and Hardwick) and the supposedly independent critics such as Malcolm Cowley.
Talk about redskins and palefaces (a nod to Philip Rahv)!
It's likely that Philip Rahv, when he was editor of the Partisan Review, had writers like Jones in mind--as Bell thought he did--when he made his unlikeable comments about red-face "open-air" Midwestern writers versus pale-skin "drawing-room" Eastern intellectuals.
The other editor, Philip Rahv, said Here, and he handed me something and said, "Copyedit this." I said, What does that mean?