rakshasa

(redirected from Raksasa)

rakshasa

(ˈrɑːkʃəsə)
n
a demon in Hindu mythology
References in periodicals archive ?
Basic shadow puppets has a complete complement of puppet are divided into ten(10) groups such as dewa-dewa (demigods), satria (warriors), raksasa (jins&gnomes), orang betapa (hermit), monyet (monkey), Kayon and haiwan(animals) and each character has its own identity.
even as regards a soul bound [in the cycle of birth and death] like a Raksasa, Pulinda, Pulkasa, etc.
a host of ten thousand chariots as swift as the wind, eighteen thousand mighty war-elephants, fourteen thousand battle-steeds along with their riders, and a full two hundred thousand raksasa foot soldiers.
Macdonald builds on Jean Przyluski's earlier work on how minor deities and magicians or vidyaraja entered the Buddhist mandala of the MMK, where they are described as 'those who take the body of a woman to save living beings, and those who borrow the form of birds, yaksa or raksasa in order to effect conversions', (88) The major instance of a Bodhisattva self-metamorphosis made explicit in the MMK is not accomplished by Vajrapani but by the Bodhisattva Manjusri, who claims he had already adopted the form of Brahma, Siva, Visnu and Garuda 'to convert creatures susceptible to this method'.
Whereas in Valmiki Surpanakha is drawn deftly as a caricature, in Kambar the differences between Surpanakha as a representative of a raksasa woman and the Tamil woman as a woman with karpu is given in detail.
At the side of the gates was placed a statue of a raksasa [monster] with eyes of diamonds, his nose bored through, reaching to his ears.
25) The remaining forms of marriage were GANDHARVA, a secret and voluntary union of the girl and boy; ASURA, which included the acceptance of bride wealth (sulka), but was still the free bestowal of the bride to the groom's family; RAKSASA , marriage by abduction, and PAISACA, when a man seduces a girl who is sleeping, intoxicated, or disordered in intellect.
6 in the Donggala PSC, then Pangkal 1 in the Papalang PSC and finally Raksasa 1, also in the Donggala PSC.
Alternatively, the demonic characters are all called raksasa, a term referring to another class of demons.
Nine months later, on leaving eastern Indonesia, we met again on Bali and I was able to see Anthony at work: the artful British anthropologist with an old Land Rover which he managed to keep going, the gentle English Raksasa living in Gelgel, the impeccable collector of art who valued objects with a social context, and who could also manage to outmanoeuvre the cleverest of dodgy art dealers, but above all, the open, outgoing, always interested, engaging ethnographer.
Nevertheless, because she falls in love with a raksasa, (10) Shakuntala's father sends her to school in a different city (Saman:119-21).
The fierce-looking raksasa to the left of the deity might be an allusion to this peculiar property of the pasupatastra.