Raman effect


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Raman effect

n.
The alteration of the frequency and the phase of light caused by scattering as the light passes through a transparent medium.

[After Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman.]

Raman effect

(ˈrɑːmən)
n
(General Physics) a change in wavelength of light that is scattered by electrons within a material. The effect is used in Raman spectroscopy for studying molecules
[C20: named after Sir Chandrasekhara Raman (1888–1970), Indian physicist]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
NSD is celebrated on 28th February to commemorate discovery of the Raman Effect, which led to Sir C.
Rajasthan, March 2 -- To popularize the benefits of scientific knowledge, 28th February is celebrated all over India as National Science Day - NSD to mark the discovery of Nobel Prize winning Raman Effect by the great Indian Physicist Sir C.
He covers the Raman effect, normal mode vibration, the elucidation of bond polarizabilities, the Raman virtual states, more applications, the extension to Raman optical activity, more applications on Raman optical activity, intramolecular enantiomerism, the unified classical theory for Raman optical activity and vibrational circular dichromism.
The phenomenon was part of a theory that was named Raman effect.
The doodle displays CV Raman's full face behind the letter G and adjacent to it shows the Raman effect with light rays emitting from a source.
Although the Raman effect is well known to physicists it has not been involved in laser action.
The underlying principle of the Raman effect can be explained through quantum mechanics.
National Science Day is celebrated to honour our Nobel laureate Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman for his invention of the Raman effect through his experiments on the scattering of light.
You will also learn that the bluish discoloration of the parietal layer of the tunica vaginalis is due to the Raman effect, another patriotic chestnut.
Raman effect was discovered almost one hundred years ago.
Detecting these rare photons is the challenge--and ultimately the payoff--for scientists seeking to harness the Raman effect for clinical applications.
According to Dr Castanon, the pounds 600,000 project exploits a natural phenomena called the Raman effect that affects light passing through a material.