Raman effect


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Raman effect

n.
The alteration of the frequency and the phase of light caused by scattering as the light passes through a transparent medium.

[After Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman.]

Raman effect

(ˈrɑːmən)
n
(General Physics) a change in wavelength of light that is scattered by electrons within a material. The effect is used in Raman spectroscopy for studying molecules
[C20: named after Sir Chandrasekhara Raman (1888–1970), Indian physicist]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The technical basis is a process that uses the Raman effect to additionally generate the wavelengths 555, 579 and 606nm from the light of a 532nm laser.
NSD is celebrated on 28th February to commemorate discovery of the Raman Effect, which led to Sir C.V.
We celebrate National Science Day on February 28 every year, because it was on this day that he discovered the phenomenon of light scattering and was also awarded Nobel Prize for his this discovery which is popularly known as the 'Raman effect'," the Prime Minister said in his monthly address, 'Mann ki Baat'.
The origin of the Raman effect occurs when a high-intensity monochromatic light beam has an impact on the vibrations of the molecules and atoms of the material that forms an optical fiber; these vibrations characteristic of the material medium are called optical phonons.
Rajasthan, March 2 -- To popularize the benefits of scientific knowledge, 28th February is celebrated all over India as National Science Day - NSD to mark the discovery of Nobel Prize winning Raman Effect by the great Indian Physicist Sir C.
The technique is neither invasive nor destructive and provides information on the vibrations of the atoms in a crystal lattice being based on the Raman effect. When a beam of monochromatic light strikes the surface of a sample, several physical phenomena may occur: the radiation can be reflected, transmitted in the material, absorbed, or scattered in all directions.
Loudon, "The Raman effect in crystals," Advances in Physics, vol.
He covers the Raman effect, normal mode vibration, the elucidation of bond polarizabilities, the Raman virtual states, more applications, the extension to Raman optical activity, more applications on Raman optical activity, intramolecular enantiomerism, the unified classical theory for Raman optical activity and vibrational circular dichromism.
The phenomenon was part of a theory that was named Raman effect.