genetic drift

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genetic drift

n.
Variation in gene frequencies in a population due to chance rather than natural selection, mutation, or immigration.

genet′ic drift′


n.
random changes in the frequency of alleles in a gene pool, usu. of small populations. Compare gene flow.
[1955–60]
References in periodicals archive ?
It assumes that mutation and random genetic drift are the major cause of evolutionary change.
He covers population biology and evolution, genetic markers for population genetics, sampling and the estimation of genetic diversity, mutation and random genetic drift, natural selection, migration and population structure, recombination and randomly mating populations, clonal populations, evolution in gene-for-gene systems, durability of the deployment of disease resistance, emerging and reemerging plant diseases, the contributions of population genetics in plant disease epidemiology, and a great many other related subjects.
falciparum K13 propeller gene as a standing variation, but most of the isolates that recently acquired the mutation may disappear because of some fitness disadvantage or the effect of a random genetic drift (14).
Smaller populations are more vulnerable to increase selfing, random genetic drift and mating among related organisms.
The loss of GD due to the random genetic drift was derived from equation GD-[GD.sup.*] and was calculated as the inverse of 2[f.sub.ne] (Caballero and Toro, 2000; Honda et al., 2004).
Apart from this, analyses of disease-related genes of higher prevalence in the Ashkenazi Jewish population indicate that only a minority of traits show signs of positive selection, suggesting that most have arisen through random genetic drift, revealed researchers at Emory University School of Medicine.
Genetic diversity is of special concern regarding endangered species because small populations tend to lose genetic diversity rapidly through random genetic drift or bottlenecks.
Technically, all finite populations are subject to some degree of random genetic drift because the number of reproductive propagules produced is always less than the number of multilocus genotypes that are possible.
Sex, chance and genes Random genetic drift is an evolutionary force to be reckoned with too.
Noting that most aspects of evolution at the genomic level can't be explained by natural selection, he explores the role of nonadaptive forces such as mutation, recombination, and random genetic drift. Some areas discussed include the significance of population size, mobile genetic elements, genomic expansion by gene duplication, and expansion and contraction of organelle genomes.
Changes in gene frequency brought about by random genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection lead to the evolution of populations.
In contrast to [d.sub.CE] and [d.sub.RE], where it is assumed that populations diverged due to random genetic drift, Nei (1972) suggested a dissimilarity coefficient based on mutation and drift, often referred to as Nei's standard dissimilarity.