raphe

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ra·phe

also rha·phe (rā′fē′)
n. pl. ra·phae (-fē′) also rha·phae
1. Anatomy A seamlike line or ridge between two similar parts of a body organ, as in the scrotum.
2. Botany The portion of the funiculus that is united to the ovule wall, commonly visible as a line or ridge on the seed coat.
3. The median groove of a diatom valve.

[New Latin, from Greek rhaphē, seam, suture, from rhaptein, to sew; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

raphe

(ˈreɪfɪ)
n, pl -phae (-fiː)
1. (Botany) an elongated ridge of conducting tissue along the side of certain seeds
2. (Microbiology) a longitudinal groove on the valve of a diatom
3. (Anatomy) anatomy a connecting ridge, such as that between the two halves of the medulla oblongata
[C18: via New Latin from Greek rhaphē a seam, from rhaptein to sew together]

ra•phe

(ˈreɪ fi)

n., pl. -phae (-fē).
1. a seam along the middle of an anatomical structure, as the underside of the tongue.
2. Bot. (in certain ovules) a ridge connecting the hilum with the chalaza.
[1745–55; < New Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raphe - a ridge that forms a seam between two parts
palatine raphe - the seam at the middle of the hard palate
scrotum - the external pouch that contains the testes
ridge - any long raised strip
Translations

ra·phe

, rhaphe
n. rafe, línea de unión de dos mitades simétricas de una estructura tal como la lengua.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bodies of serotonergic neurons are located in the CNS structures called the raphe nuclei.
Other connections between vestibular nuclei and brainstem structures such as the parabrachial nucleus, raphe nuclei, and locus coeruleus may be responsible for sensitization of the TVS and nociceptive pathways during VM episodes [39-41].
Receptors for gonadal hormones have been identified in the amygdala, hippocampus, cortex, basal forebrain, cerebellum, locus coeruleus, midbrain raphe nuclei, glial cells, pituitary gland, hypothalamus, and central gray matter.
Conditioned-fear stress increases Fos expression in monoaminergic and GABAergic neurons of the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nuclei.