natural theology

(redirected from Rational theology)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

natural theology

n.
A theology holding that knowledge of God may be acquired by human reason and observation alone without the aid of revealed knowledge.

natural theology

n
(Theology) the attempt to derive theological truth, and esp the existence of God, from empirical facts by reasoned argument. Compare revealed religion, fideism, revelation3
natural theologian n

nat′ural theol′ogy


n.
theology based on knowledge of the natural world and on human reason, apart from revelation.
[1670–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural theology - a theology that holds that knowledge of God can be acquired by human reason without the aid of divine revelation
theological system, theology - a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings; "Jewish theology"; "Roman Catholic theology"
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: In the context of the intellectual life of Muslim societies, systematic rational theology was traditionally seen as a discipline in its own right.
The philosophically most significant lectures are undoubtedly his lectures on metaphysics and rational theology, spanning his entire career and delivered between 1755 and 1796.
is chosen because he is said to be among the Greek philosophers who have thought about the existence of God, and the natural or rational theology is said to be originated from him.
1072/1661-2), in whose thinking "a ratiocinative philosophy, a rational theology, and an arational intuitive Sufi path" appear as three hierarchical levels of inquiry on the way to Truth (p.
It was a product of the moral and religious reinterpretation and intellectual exertion of a new expression of a rational theology of faith.
Hosle affirms that only rational theology can answer Aunt May's challenge to optimistic theism (of the orthodox Jew in Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors).
Rational theology in interfaith communication; Abu l-Husayn al-Basri's Mu'tazili theology among the Karaites in the Fatimid age.