Ratisbon


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Related to Ratisbon: Regensburg

Ratisbon

(ˈrætɪzˌbɒn)
n
(Placename) the former English name for Regensburg
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References in periodicals archive ?
Rector of the Propaganda College in Rome, Father Loreto Jacovacci circulated a letter on the matter that would eventually attract the interest of Ratisbon reformer Franz Xavier Haberl; according to Jacovacci, "The Church has wisely directed that this chant be joined to her liturgy.
And Accursio was also in Ratisbon in 1532 when Garcilaso arrived with Fernando de Toledo on his way to the imperial court from Spain (59).
The beautiful plainsong melodies (a simple and an ornate form) are variously given in the Ratisbon antiphonary and in the Solesmes "Liber Usualis" of 1908, the ornate form in the latter work, with rhythmical signs added, being very attractive.
Still called by its historical name of Ratisbon, it was the seat of the Imperial Diet and diplomatic centre of the Holy Roman Empire.
In Faber's letters to Ignatius from the Diet of Worms (where he was sent in 1540 to uphold Catholicism in Germany) and the Diet of Ratisbon (1541), he indicated that he and the Church must set examples to counter the misery, sin, and infamy he was experiencing.
Male dramatists during the Restoration were often in embarrassed circumstances: Wycherley spent at least a year in debtors' prison and was in legal troubles over his debts for the last three decades of his life; George Etherege took minor diplomatic posts, first in Constantinople and then in Ratisbon (or Regensburg, as it is also known), that interrupted and then effectively ended his theatrical career; Thomas Otway died penniless despite a run of successful plays in the early 1680s; and Nathaniel Lee, the son of a prominent Anglican clergyman, spent four years in Bedlam before he died in the streets.
Superbly organized and a work of impeccable scholarship, Papal Legislation On Sacred Music begins with chapters on the earlier Popes, John XXII and "Docta Sanctorum Patrum", the Council of Trent, and the Medicean Edition of the Chant Books, to church and religious music of the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, the Ratisbon and Solesmes editions of the Chant Books, the reforms of Pius X, the Vatican Edition of the Chant Books, the "Motu Proprio" of November 22, 1903, and the final chapter "Conclusions".
The current Renaissance-style synagogue was built on the same site in 1577 by Rabbi Israel ben Joseph Isserles, a rich immigrant from Ratisbon, banker to King Sigismund Augustus, as part of an effort to buy himself into the community.
However, Whitworth did not move straight from the Board of Trade to the Diet of Ratisbon.
And Etherege, whose work does show an affinity for 'The Last Night's Ramble', was far from London, on an embassy to the Holy Roman Emperor in Ratisbon.
The remaining come from places as diverse as Salzburg, Ratisbon, and Corvey--but all show the unmistakeable influence of the Fulda scriptorium.