rattlesnake

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Related to Rattlesnakes: diamondback rattlesnakes

rat·tle·snake

 (răt′l-snāk′)
n.
Any of various venomous pit vipers of the genera Crotalus and Sistrurus of the Americas, having at the end of the tail a series of loosely attached, horny segments that can be vibrated to produce a rattling or buzzing sound.

rattlesnake

(ˈrætəlˌsneɪk)
n
(Animals) any of the venomous New World snakes constituting the genera Crotalus and Sistrurus, such as C. horridus (black or timber rattlesnake): family Crotalidae (pit vipers). They have a series of loose horny segments on the tail that are vibrated to produce a buzzing or whirring sound

rat•tle•snake

(ˈræt lˌsneɪk)

n.
any of several New World pit vipers of the genera Crotalus and Sistrurus, having a rattle at the end of the tail.
[1620–30, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rattlesnake - pit viper with horny segments at the end of the tail that rattle when shakenrattlesnake - pit viper with horny segments at the end of the tail that rattle when shaken
Crotalidae, family Crotalidae - New World vipers: pit vipers
pit viper - New World vipers with hollow fangs and a heat-sensitive pit on each side of the head
rattle - loosely connected horny sections at the end of a rattlesnake's tail
Crotalus adamanteus, diamondback, diamondback rattlesnake - large deadly rattlesnake with diamond-shaped markings
banded rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus horridus, timber rattlesnake - widely distributed in rugged ground of eastern United States
Crotalus viridis, prairie rattler, prairie rattlesnake, Western rattlesnake - widely distributed between the Mississippi and the Rockies
Crotalus cerastes, horned rattlesnake, sidewinder - small pale-colored desert rattlesnake of southwestern United States; body moves in an s-shaped curve
Crotalus atrox, Western diamondback, Western diamondback rattlesnake - largest and most dangerous North American snake; of southwestern United States and Mexico
Crotalus lepidus, rock rattlesnake - mountain rock dweller of Mexico and most southern parts of United States southwest
Crotalus tigris, tiger rattlesnake - having irregularly cross-banded back; of arid foothills and canyons of southern Arizona and Mexico
Crotalus scutulatus, Mojave rattlesnake - extremely dangerous; most common in areas of scattered scrubby growth; from Mojave Desert to western Texas and into Mexico
Crotalus mitchellii, speckled rattlesnake - markings vary but usually harmonize with background; of southwestern Arizona and Baja California
massasauga rattler, Sistrurus catenatus, massasauga - pygmy rattlesnake found in moist areas from the Great Lakes to Mexico; feeds on mice and small amphibians
ground rattler, massasauga, Sistrurus miliaris - small pygmy rattlesnake
Translations
أفْعى ذات أجْراسأَفْعَى ذاتُ الَأجْراس
chřestýš
klapperslange
kalkkarokäärme
čegrtuša
csörgõkígyócsörgőkígyó
skröltormur
ガラガラヘビ
방울뱀
barškuolė
štrkáč
klopotača
skallerorm
งูกะปะ
rắn chuông

rattlesnake

[ˈrætlsneɪk] Nserpiente f de cascabel, yarará f (Andes)

rattlesnake

[ˈrætəlsneɪk] ncrotale m, serpent m à sonnettesrat trap npiège m à rats

rattlesnake

[ˈrætlˌsneɪk] ncrotalo, serpente m a sonagli

rattle

(rӕtl) verb
1. to (cause to) make a series of short, sharp noises by knocking together. The cups rattled as he carried the tray in; The strong wind rattled the windows.
2. to move quickly. The car was rattling along at top speed.
3. to upset and confuse (a person). Don't let him rattle you – he likes annoying people.
noun
1. a series of short, sharp noises. the rattle of cups.
2. a child's toy, or a wooden instrument, which makes a noise of this sort. The baby waved its rattle.
3. the bony rings of a rattlesnake's tail.
ˈrattling adjective
fast; lively. The car travelled at a rattling pace.
ˈrattlesnake noun
a type of poisonous American snake with bony rings in its tail which rattle.
rattle off
to say quickly and usually without any feeling or expression. The boy rattled off the poem.
rattle through
to say or do (something) quickly. The teacher rattled through his explanation so quickly that no-one could understand him.

rattlesnake

أَفْعَى ذاتُ الَأجْراس chřestýš klapperslange Klapperschlange κροταλίας serpiente de cascabel kalkkarokäärme serpent à sonnette čegrtuša serpente a sonagli ガラガラヘビ 방울뱀 ratelslang klapperslange grzechotnik cascavel гремучая змея skallerorm งูกะปะ çıngıraklı yılan rắn chuông 响尾蛇

rat·tle·snake

n. serpiente de cascabel;
___ poisonveneno de la ___.

rattlesnake

n serpiente f de cascabel
References in classic literature ?
For more than a week we had seen, besides ourselves and our animals, only such living things as rattlesnakes and horned toads.
Likewise Michael came to know what Harley Kennan never did know and always denied as existing on his ranch--the one rocky outcrop, in the dense heart of the mountain forest, where a score of rattlesnakes denned through the winters and warmed themselves in the sun.
A RATTLESNAKE came home to his brood and said: "My children, gather about and receive your father's last blessing, and see how a Christian dies.
And sometimes a rosy little school-boy climbed into our chair, and sat staring, with wide-open eyes, at the alligator, the rattlesnake, and the other curiosities of the barber's shop.
I went to the cavern to get some, and found a rattlesnake in there.
Cuvier, in opposition to some other naturalists, makes this a sub-genus of the rattlesnake, and intermediate between it and the viper.
He thought he saw a Rattlesnake That questioned him in Greek: He looked again, and found it was The Middle of Next Week.
To me he is power--he is the primitive, the wild wolf, the striking rattlesnake, the stinging centipede," said Arrellano.
Most of the men, when they came out, made straight for a saloon--they seemed to place fertilizer and rattlesnake poison in one class.
Then Joe and Huck had another swim, but Tom would not venture, because he found that in kicking off his trousers he had kicked his string of rattlesnake rattles off his ankle, and he wondered how he had escaped cramp so long without the pro- tection of this mysterious charm.
Bradbury, in the course of his botanical researches, found a surprising number in a half torpid state, under flat stones upon the banks which overhung the cantonment, and narrowly escaped being struck by a rattlesnake, which darted at him from a cleft in the rock, but fortunately gave him warning by his rattle.
Not a rattleSNAKE, you know,' she added hastily, thinking that he was frightened: only an old rattle--quite old and broken.