Rayleigh wave

(redirected from Rayleigh waves)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.
Related to Rayleigh waves: tsunami

Rayleigh wave

n.
A type of seismic surface wave that moves with a rolling motion, causing rock particles to vibrate in directions both perpendicular and parallel to the main direction of wave propagation. Rayleigh waves are slower than Love waves.

[After John William Strutt, Third Baron Rayleigh.]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
These sensors were chosen due to their small aperture and their high resonance frequency, which would emphasize the amplitude of Rayleigh waves versus their response to Lamb modes.
[R.sub.H], [R.sub.V]--spectra of horizontal and vertical components of Rayleigh waves,
The phase velocity of Rayleigh waves is inverted to an S-wave velocity (Vs) profile using optimization techniques.
Apart from the displacement amplitudes of body waves which we were previously studied, also a distinct wave group of Rayleigh waves was recorded, which later underwent the procedure of spectral analysis.
The winds cause shallow, longer-period waves called Rayleigh waves.
Narayan studied the propagation characteristics of Rayleigh waves in layered media by the finite difference method [10].
Finally, the transformation frequency number of wave frequency F-K [14, 17, 18] allows obtaining the dispersion curve to determine the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves according to their vibration mode [19, 20].
present an approach of acoustic nonlinearity of fatigue damage accumulation that utilizes Rayleigh waves generated from EMAT and electromagnetic acoustic resonance [21, 22].
Very often, surface waves are acquired and analyzed by considering only the vertical component of Rayleigh waves. The shear-wave velocity (Vs) profile of the investigated site is then typically obtained through the inversion of a user-picked modal dispersion curve (e.g.
Vibration propagates through the ground in the form of body waves (compression and shear waves), and in the form of surface or Rayleigh waves
(56-58) These peaks can be explained by acoustic resonance between Rayleigh waves propagating in the solid Earth and low-frequency acoustic waves in the atmosphere.