Raynaud's disease

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Ray·naud's disease

 (rā-nōz′)
n.
A circulatory disorder caused by insufficient blood supply to the hands and feet and resulting in cyanosis, numbness, pain, and, in extreme cases, gangrene.

[After Maurice Raynaud, (1834-1881), French physician.]

Raynaud's disease

(ˈreɪnəʊz)
n
(Pathology) a disease, mainly affecting women, in which spasms in the blood vessels of the fingers or toes restrict blood flow to the affected part, which becomes pale, numb, and sometimes painful. Often shortened to: Raynaud's
[named after Maurice Raynaud (1834–81), French physician who first described it]

Ray•naud's′ disease`

(reɪˈnoʊz)
n.
a vascular disorder characterized by blanching and numbness of the fingers or toes upon exposure to cold or stress.
[1880–85; after Maurice Raynaud (1834–81), French physician, who described it]
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References in periodicals archive ?
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2 BLUE FINGERTIPS THIS can be a sign of poor circulation and is common in a condition called Raynaud's syndrome, in which the small blood vessels in the extremities are over-sensitive to changes in temperature.
Here are 12 signs to watch out for and what they could mean 1 BLUE FINGERTIPS THIS can be a sign of poor circulation and is common in a condition called Raynaud's syndrome, in which the small blood vessels in the extremities are over-sensitive to changes in temperature.
For the 20% of us who suffer from Raynaud's syndrome, this is a major problem - so "don't warm your chilly hands on a radiator", advises Dr Pye.