Re-creative

Re`-cre`a´tive


a.1.Creating anew; as, re-creative power.
References in periodicals archive ?
I've always wanted to be more creative than re-creative, and that's what I like about photography-you're making your own art, on the spot.'
God renewed the human race with his re-creative love and forgiving kindness.
Physical therapy techniques with aspects of creative and re-creative activities are, for example, animal-assisted therapy, horticultural therapy, and caregiver singing.
For example, Colvin and Meyer (1906) studied imaginative writing by schoolchildren, Royce (1898) studied inventiveness, McCloy and Meier (1931) conducted research on "re-creative imagination," and Cattell, Glascock, and Washburn (1931) began to develop a test of aesthetic judgment.
Writing on the subject of Romanticism in the October 1959 issue of Apollo, Horace Shipp commented: 'This was not merely a style and a fashion in pictorial and plastic art, but a vast stirring of the human spirit which inevitably demanded expression and transformed literature, pictures, sculpture, music, architecture and the crafts because it transformed life itself.' The transformative nature of Romanticism, Shipp proposed, led it to being 'destructive and re-creative'.
This re-creative process shares similarities with various fields, such as sound design and language.
The teachers Hurworth worked with at that time were unfamiliar with composing, or how to get children to undertake any activity other than re-creative music education.
And, if a nonexistent Void could have transformed in space over time to passively serve a pivotal, re-creative process, an inflationary period might have occurred--out of necessity.
In three books published over a period of eighteen years, Sharmistha Mohanty has been showing, with increasing consistency and verve, that there is more to contemporary creative writing in India than the marketable mix of magic realism, hip journalism, and re-creative nonfiction revered by most publishers and media outlets.