realism

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re·al·ism

(rē′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. An inclination toward literal truth and pragmatism.
2. The representation in art or literature of objects, actions, or social conditions as they actually are, without idealization or presentation in abstract form.
3. Philosophy
a. The scholastic doctrine, opposed to nominalism, that universals exist independently of their being thought.
b. The modern philosophical doctrine, opposed to idealism, that objects exist independently of their being perceived.

realism

(ˈrɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. awareness or acceptance of the physical universe, events, etc, as they are, as opposed to the abstract or ideal
2. awareness or acceptance of the facts and necessities of life; a practical rather than a moral or dogmatic view of things
3. (Art Terms) a style of painting and sculpture that seeks to represent the familiar or typical in real life, rather than an idealized, formalized, or romantic interpretation of it
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any similar school or style in other arts, esp literature
5. (Philosophy) philosophy the thesis that general terms such as common nouns refer to entities that have a real existence separate from the individuals which fall under them. See also universal11b Compare Platonism, nominalism, conceptualism, naive realism
6. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that physical objects continue to exist whether they are perceived or not. Compare idealism, phenomenalism
7. (Logic) logic philosophy the theory that the sense of a statement is given by a specification of its truth conditions, or that there is a reality independent of the speaker's conception of it that determines the truth or falsehood of every statement
8. (Philosophy) logic philosophy the theory that the sense of a statement is given by a specification of its truth conditions, or that there is a reality independent of the speaker's conception of it that determines the truth or falsehood of every statement

re•al•ism

(ˈri əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. interest in or concern for the actual or real, as distinguished from the abstract, speculative, etc.
2. the tendency to view or represent things as they really are.
3. (usu. cap.) a style of painting and sculpture developed about the mid-19th century in which figures and scenes are depicted as they are or might be experienced in everyday life.
4. a style or theory of literature in which familiar aspects of life are represented in a straightforward or plain manner.
5. Philos.
a. the doctrine that universals have a real objective existence. Compare conceptualism (def. 1), nominalism.
b. the doctrine that objects of sense perception have an existence independent of the act of perception. Compare idealism (def. 5).
[1810–20; compare French réalisme]

Realism

1. Naturalism.
2. a movement in the late 19th century stressing common rather than individual characteristics as the basis of reality. Cf. Verism. — Realist, n.
See also: Art
1. the doctrine that universals have a real objective existence. Cf. idealism.
2. the doctrine that objects of sense perception have an existence independent of the act of perception. — realist, n.
See also: Philosophy

realism

1. (c 1830–80) A largely French movement that developed in reaction to idealized and mythical/historical subjects. Courbet is by far the most notable practitioner of the form.
2. A medieval doctrine that universals such as “the good” have real existence.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.realism - the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
practicality - concerned with actual use rather than theoretical possibilities
2.realism - the state of being actual or real; "the reality of his situation slowly dawned on him"
actuality - the state of actually existing objectively; "a hope that progressed from possibility to actuality"
fact - an event known to have happened or something known to have existed; "your fears have no basis in fact"; "how much of the story is fact and how much fiction is hard to tell"
3.realism - (philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that physical objects continue to exist when not perceived
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
4.realism - an artistic movement in 19th century France; artists and writers strove for detailed realistic and factual description
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
5.realism - (philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that abstract concepts exist independent of their names
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy

realism

noun
1. pragmatism, common sense, practicality, level-headedness, clear-sightedness It was the time now to show political realism.
2. authenticity, naturalism, verisimilitude, fidelity, faithfulness, truthfulness Sincere performances and gritty Boston settings add to the film's realism
Translations
واقِعِيَّه
realismus
realisme
realismo
realizam
realizmus
raunsæi; raunhyggja
realism
realizmus
realism
gerçekçilik

realism

[ˈrɪəlɪzəm] Nrealismo m

realism

[ˈrɪəlɪzəm] nréalisme m

realism

nRealismus m

realism

[ˈrɪəˌlɪzm] n (also) (Art) → realismo

real

(riəl) adjective
1. which actually exists. There's a real monster in that cave.
2. not imitation; genuine. real leather; Is that diamond real?
3. actual. He may own the factory, but it's his manager who is the real boss.
4. great. a real surprise/problem.
adverb
(especially American) very; really. a real nice house.
ˈrealist noun
a person who sees, or claims to see, life as it is, without being affected by emotion etc.
ˈrealism noun
ˌreaˈlistic adjective
(negative unrealistic).
1. showing things as they really are. a realistic painting.
2. taking a sensible, practical view of life. I'd like to think we'd sell five of these a day, but it would be more realistic to say two.
ˌreaˈlistically adverb
reality (riˈӕləti) noun
1. that which is real and not imaginary. It was a relief to get back to reality after hearing the ghost story.
2. the state of being real.
3. (often in plural reˈalities) a fact. Death and sorrow are two of the grim realities of human existence.
ˈreally adverb
1. in fact. He looks a fool but he is really very clever.
2. very. That's a really nice hat!
interjection
an expression of surprise, protest, doubt etc. `I'm going to be the next manager.' `Oh really?'; Really! You mustn't be so rude!
real estate
(the buying and selling of) land and houses.
for real
(especially American) genuine; true. He says he's got a new bike, but I don't know if that's for real.
in reality
really; actually. He pretends to be busy, but in reality he has very little to do.
References in periodicals archive ?
Political scientist John Mearsheimer's The Tragedy of Great Power Politics shows how the realist perspective can be used to interrogate history for pertinent lessons about policy, as do later works by fellow international affairs scholars Stephen M.
Also, from a critical realist perspective the individual is a key entity/object inside the firm with causal powers resulting in mechanisms that help explain the existence or non-existence of LT/LMT innovation amongst firms.
From a realist perspective, mathematical statements can be regarded as objectively true if there are some mathematical posits that make them true.
The articles included in the volume express a noted realist perspective on the issue of Muslim-Christian conflict, however.
In the mid to late twentieth century explications of the "scientific method" veered away from the realist perspective primarily based on the work of philosophers like Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend.
From the outset, it is clear that Internal Security Services assumes the realist perspective, from its approving quotation of Machiavelli that "security for man is impossible unless it be conjoined with power" (p.
For the purpose of this analysis, I have selected the key arguments provided by a Realist perspective on regional integration, expanding upon them before proceeding to comparison with the Social-Constructivist response to the specific point.
One, the realist perspective of the use of force against the violators until they are defeated or come to terms and the second is that the liberal school of international relations which emphasizes that, issues to be resolved through talks and negotiation.
She outlines the international and historical higher education context and contemporary movements in student learning research; the theories of critical realism, the concepts of Archer, a realist perspective on knowledge and curriculum, and how these theories can be drawn together to focus on the development of student agency; her research and the data in terms of student choice to study engineering, the experience of being an engineering student, engagement with peers and educators, and engagement with studies; and the potential significance of this information for student learning and change in the engineering education and higher education systems.
Ecological economists have long been advocates of a realist perspective concerning the biophysical world and via their appeals to the laws of thermodynamics.
They focus exclusively on economic and geopolitical interests from a realist perspective, something that governments in the region
Finally, from a realist perspective, if Nikita Khrushchev were alive today, he might say, "You will see -- I'll send political shockwaves through the Caucasus.