Reapproach

Re`ap`proach´

    (rē`ăp`prōch´)
v. i. & t.1.To approach again or anew.
References in classic literature ?
I reapproached the wall; I replied to the yells of him who clamoured.
If they're capable of managing their affairs for now, you may want to drop the matter and reapproach them later.
Many factors contributed to the high retention rates, including the short (semiannual) follow-up periods, the continuity and strong skill set of the interviewers, mailers and other contact activities between waves, the availability of accurate contact data from the public assistance records, the collection of reapproach information at the end of each interview, and the use of incentives.
In what follows, I briefly outline Maritain's understanding of "creative intuition," "poetry," and "connaturality," and how these categories enable him to reapproach the problem of transcendence (and the transcendentals) in art even in the inhospitable terrain of twentieth-century art and philosophy.
Resection of the redundant diaphragm and reapproach with overlapping edges have been described, similar to the Mayo technique for umbilical hernia.
It is reflexive, requiring the researcher's constant willingness to reapproach the research inquiry from a new position.
The data indicates that the majority of states will have to cope with declines for a few more years before the numbers gradually reapproach 2010 levels, she says.
Would it mean that the child would have to suffer under that loss and have no ability to reapproach the court to consider the substance of the claim against the health provider?
98, 110 (2010) (establishing a rule that once a suspect invokes her Miranda right to counsel, the police may reapproach her after a two-week break in custody, and noting that "law enforcement officers need to know, with certainty and beforehand, when renewed interrogation is lawful"); Cnty.
Not that the mode is apologetic tout court; far from a retreat back to a prior conception of objectivity, Latour's essay works to reapproach fact from an enriched perspective embracing (matters of) concern and the pluralistic notion of a Thing as a gathering or society of entities: "the question was never to get away from facts but closer to them" (231).The guiding impulse or motivation, however, is that "the critic is not the one who debunks, but the one who assembles" (246), evolving into a manifesto of "compositionism"--"there are enough ruins and ...
* Reapproach patients to discuss or revisit consent as needed, because their capacity to provide informed consent may vary over time.